Skip to main content

Full text of "College News: Lebanon Valley College Publication (Fall 1912)"

See other formats


COIiliEGE Tit: WS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume iV. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, September* 24, 1912 No. 35 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



President and Faculty 

Our new president, Dr. G. D. 
Gossard, who was elected before the 
opening of school, comes to us from 
Baltimore, where he was a true and 
devoted pastor in our First Church, 
there. Dr. Gossard is a native of 
Pennsylvania, and a graduate from 
the classical course at Otterbein Uni- 
versity of the class of 1892. In 1816 
he finished at the Union Biblical 
Seminary, since then he has been 
active in pastorate work. During his 
stay in Baltimore, he pursued studies 
at the Johns Hopkins University. 

President Gossard has a winning 
personality and great intelligence 
along educational lines and we feel 
sure that with other fine qualities 
which he posesses, he cannot help but 
succeed. Dr. and Mrs. Gossard, a 
woman of culture and refinement, will 
make their home in Annville after 
conference. 

Mr. Robert Mc. D. Kirkland, A. B. 
University of Chicago A. M. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, (P. D. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania 1913), has been 
elected Professor of Latin and French. 
Professor Kirkland has been Instructor 
in classics in Princeton for the last 
two years. 

Mr. George H. Pritchard. A. B., 
Ohio Northern University 1908, nas 
been elected Physical Director and 
Instructor in Physics. Mr. Pritchard 
is an all round athlete. He comes to 
Lebanon Valley from Trinity Univer- 
sity. 

Mr. Samuel O. Grimm, A. B., 
Lebanon Valley, 1912, has charge of 
the Academy. 

Miss Gertrude Schmidt of New 
Brunswick, N. J., is the newly elected 
instructor of Voice. Miss Schmidt is 
a graduate of the Vocal Department 
of the Damrosch Institute of Musical 
Art of New York City and has had 
several years experience as a vocal 
teacher and soloist. 

Professor banner is offering 
courses in agriculture. 



Foot ball Prospects 

Never has Lebanon Valley had 
brighter prospects for a more brilliant 
season in football. Eight members of 
the old team have returned while most 
of the new men have had experience 
on high school and college teams. 

Among the new men who have come 
in are Dayhnff, of Steelton, formerly 
a star on the Gettysburg college 
eleven, Kirkpatrick of Harrisburg, 
Goncier, Pell, and Evans from Lykens, 
Brown, of Pottstown, Ed. Light, of 
Lebanon, and Hollinger, of Annville. 

The men give promise of making 
fast players, Pell and Strickler at 
half back, while Larew is showing 
better form than ever at quarterback. 
Charlton still holds his old position 
at tackle and is showing marked im- 
provement every day. 

Coach Piitchard will have the 
squad well conditioned ^for the Indian 
game, which will be played at Car- 
lisle, on Wednesday. Following is 
the schedule for the coming season : 

Sept. 25-Indians at Carlisle. 

Oct. 5— Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 

Oct. 12— Delaware at Newark. 

Oct. 19— Albright at Annville. 

Oct. 23— Mt. St. Mary's at Emmits- 
burg. 

Nov. 2— Indian Reserves at Ann- 
ville. 

Nov. 9— Ursinus a 1 ". Collegeville. 
Nov. 16— Albright at Myerstown. 
Nov. 23 — Philadelphia Col. of 
Pharmacy at Annville. 

New Executive Board 

At a recent meeting of the Athletic 
Association John Leininger, '13, G. 
A. Richie, '13, and L. B. Harnish, 
'14 were elected to represent the 
student body on the Executive Board 
of the Association. 

Alvin Weaver, '15 was elected 
secretary of the Association. Ivan 
L. Ressler, '13 ,was elected base ball 
man?ger to fill the place of C. Y. 
Ulrich, resigned. 



Opening Exercises 

Wednesday, September the eleven- 
th, Lebanon Valley began another 
year of work with a splendid outlook. 
The opening address was delivered by 
Rev. Gossard, D. D., our newly elect- 
ed Preisdent. He gave briefly the 
history of our school and the reason for 
its existance. In the early history of 
our countiy colleges were established 
for the ministers only but later the 
great need arose for the better ed- 
ucation of all. The purposes of higher 
institutions of learning are to help 
each student find himself, to give him 
the opportunity for greatest useful- 
ness. It aims to develope clean, 
forceful citizens ready to cope with 
our great problems. If a college 
neglects to develop well rounded men 
and women, it has failed for if only 
the intellectual side is developed man 
is a book worm; if only the religious, 
he is a fanatic ; only^the physical, he is 
a brute. The old idea f>f education 
has gradually given away to the more 
modern view, that of a practical ed- 
ucation. For the latter fits men 
more fullly for a life of service to his 
fellow men. Our education must be 
practical or we are misfits. Times 
demand not only cultured people but 
those, who are able to lead. Stu- 
dents expect many things from a 
college and vice versa. As students, 
they expect a good school, good 
faculty, courteous treatment, good 
food with a little hash, and a 
SQUARE DEAL. While the other 
side expects in the first place ladies 
and gentlemen, good students, 
courteous treatment to others and to 
those higher in authority. The 
college demands above all things that 
we become Builders. 

An amusing story was told of a 
young man who applied for entrance 
at a certain school and demanded thai 
his education be completed within 
Continued on page 2 ^ 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College ISLetus 

Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
G. A. WILLIAMS, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

This issue of the "College News" 
begs leave to bring a hearty greeting 
and best wishes for the ensuing year, 
to all the students, old and new, to 
the faculty and friends of the school. 

After our pleasant summer vacation, 
we have returned to our tasks— cer- 
tainly with hearts and minds ready 
for good earnest work. To make the 
very most of our opportunities in the 
class-room, on the athletic field, in the 
Christian Associations, in our Literary 
Societies and in all phases of college 
life,— these should be our resolutions 
for the year. This only, will make us 
strong and broad minded, while to 
"hobby in one line produces weak > 
selfish and narrow students. Let us 
enter all the activities of college life 
with vigor and interest. 

During the summer, improvements 
have been made around the school, 
which must enlarge our advantages, 
intellectually, morally and physically. 

The old Academy building has been 
remodeled and is now in use; other 
improvements and repairs have been 
made in and about the buildings; a 
new athletic director has been 
employed and good teachers have 
been elected to fill the various 



vacancies on the faculty. Above all, 
a President has lately been elected 
who has already inspired confidence in 
the hearts of the students. With 
these added advantages, we cannot 
help but earnestly endeavor and strive 
to do our work well and thus further 
the welfare of the sohool. 

The administration promises to be 
one of hope and prosperity. Our 
President in his opening address on 
Wednesday morning gave its Keynote, 
—a square deal to everyone, now; a 
gymnasium, as soon as possible; and 
$300,0000 endowment by 1916. With 
this aim before us, and with this 
energetic point of view, — why should 
not this be the best year L. V. has 
yet seen? 



Social Event 

The first social event of the school 
year occurred on Saturday night, 
Sept. 14, when the Y. W. C. A. and 
Y. M. C. A. gave a reception in honor 
of the new students. 

This reception was the twenty-sixth 
to be given by the Christian Associa- 
tions, After an hour of everybody 
welcoming everybody else, a short but 
splendid, program was rendered. 
Prof. Lehman gave an excellent little 
address on the unique subject "How 
to Fail." He was followed by Prof. 
Derickson, who aroused laughter by 
his story of the "uatriotic juice" and 
college spirit by his application of it. 

Prof. Shenk intensified both feelings 
* 

by a short talk in his usual happy 
style. In all the speeches, great in- 
terest in athletics for the year, was 
shown. 

Misses Edith Gingrich and Lottie 
Spessard added greatly to the plea- 
sure of the evening by singing a 
beautiful duet. 

After refreshments were served, 
the seniors led off in a rousing class 
yell, they were followed by the other 
classes and then by everybody uniting 
in the college yells and songs. 

The only regret, at the close of the 
evening lay in the fact that our hon- 
ored president and his wife, Dr. and 
Mrs. Gossard, could not be with us. 



Miss Nora Hammond, of Hagers- 
town spent Monday, Sept. 16th at this 
place. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday afternoon 
was led by Miss Lottie M. Spessard 
and the subject for consideration 
was "God's out-of-doors," a very 
appropriate topic fur this time of the 
year, as for all times. 

Miss Spessard in her discussion 
pointed out new and old lessons to be 
taken from nature. Many of the 
Christian virtues we find exemplified 
in the things about us, such as the 
endurance of the reck, the sturdy 
strength of the oak, and the cheerful 
trust of the birds: "The groves were 
God's first temples" and it is in 
Nature that we come nearest to our 
Creator. The general discussion of 
the topic was brief but interesting. 

Y. VV. C. A. as an organization has 
taken on new life this fall. The 
girls are very much interested in the 
work and many new members have 
been added to the roll. A new 
feature of the Association is the 
prayer circle which meets after study 
h^urs at 9 :30, in the different girls 
rooms. 



Opening Exercises 

Continued from page 1 



three months. The principal ask him 
whether he would rather become a 
squash or a great oak. It takes time, 
patience and work for the education, 
which the young man wished to ac- 
quire in three months. We find that 
education makes quite a difference in 
lives for the gap between a white 
washer and a painter, as Rapheal, is 
education; between a mason and a 
sculptor as Angelo, is education. 

Many good things were suggested 
for consideration as a means for our 
further development such as the four 
term year, domestic science, an ex- 
periment station in connection with 
our agriculture course. 

Lebanon Valley, has placed before 
her two great goals, an endowment 
fund of $300,000 by 1916, her goldeit 
jubilee and a gymnasium, and with 
these two aims before her, she will go 
on. "We can do it and we will." 



Miss Mary Daugherty, '16 was at. 
her home in Myerstown, over Sunday. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, May Meyer; Original 
story, Florence Clippinger; Debate- 
Resolved, that for the same work, 
women's wages should he equal to 
mien's wages. Affirmative, Edith 
Lehman, Ruth V. Engle; Negative, 
Ruth E. Engle, Elizabeth Reichard; 
(Quartette, Florence Christeson, Edith 
Gingrich, Ora Bachman, Lottie Spes- 
•sard ; Book review, Clara Horn; Piano 
.yolo, Ora Bachman. 

KALOZETEAN 
Foot ball prospects for 1912, P. L. 
Sttickler; Pianj solo, M. L. Miller; 
Debate— Resolved, That the public 
Utilities of the United States Should 
be Owned and Controlled by the 
'Government at the Present Time. 
Affirmative, H. E. Snavely, T. B. 
Lyter; Negative, C. L. Shepley, J. B. 
Lyter; Dialogue, V. M. Heffelfinger ; 
E. M. Landis; Extempore. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Review of the week, Geo. M. 
Haverstock ; Piano solo, D. Ellis 
Zimmerman; Football outlook, C. E. 
Brenneman; Debate — Resolved, That 
the Church Accomplishes More Good, 
Than the Y. M. C. A. Affirmative, 
Howard Olewiler, J. Maurice Leister; 
Negative, A. L. Weaver, 0. E. 
Krenz; Postal Saving Banks, C. H. 
Uhrich; Living Thoughts, Editor. 



Poster Scraps 

On Thursday of the opening week 
of school, the Freshmen were initiated 
into the ways of college life, by 
thair enemies, the Sophs. The 
Freshmen who live in the dormitory, 
were aroused from their slumbers, in 
the middle of the night, by the Sophs, 
and forced to go with them to help put 
uptha posters. Several of the Fresh- 
men tried to escape, but these weie 
quick ly brought back to their work by 
their watchful enemies. 

Most of the posters remained in 
Place until chapel time, so the victory 
belongs to the Sophs. Th^re was 
no scrapping, since the Freshmen 
were prisoners, but at best, ihey 
cannot be blamed since the Sophs out- 
number them at least three to one. 




Alumni 




On September the third, George U. 
Hoffer, '09, and Miss Goldie Margaret 
Arndt were married at the bride's 
home in Delphi, Indiana. Mr. 
Hoffer is Reaching in Perdue Univer- 
sity. 

Earl Carmany, '12, will leave on 
Tuesday for Pittsburg where he will 
teach in a preparatory school. 

Samuel Plummer, '12, who was 
visiting friends about the school, has 
returned to Emmitsburg, Md., where 
he will take up his duties as principal 
of the high school. 

Earl Renn, '10, was the guest of 
his sister last week 

Forres*- Hensel, '12, spent Wednes- 
day visiting friends at L. V. C. 

Oliver Butterwick, '12, First Assis- 
tant principal of the High School at 
Hershey, looked the football squad 
over, on Friday. 

Rev. Phares Holdeman, '11 a stu- 
dent at Bonebrake Seminary is visit- 
ing relatives in Annville, 

J. Ed. Marshall, '11, a medical stu- 
dent at U. of P., visited at Elizabeth- 
town, on Saturday. 

Mr. Is^hy, '12 and Chester Rettew, 
'12 spent Friday at their Alma Mater. 



Items of Interest 



E. Kephart Boughter, '13, spent 
the week end with his parents at 
Oberlin. 

Many new men have journeyed to 
Lebanon to take in the wonderful 
sights of our sister city. 

Miss Maude Kerschner, of Shoe- 
makerville was [the guest of Ruth 
Engle, Sept. 13-16. 



INew Students 

This notice applies to "old^students 
as well as to new ones. Team the 
college yells and songs. Nothing 
helps and spurs a]j;eam]£to greater 
efforts than to nave good, spirited 
cheering. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

UVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties ?i Specialty 

I I. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, I 'a 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

GET YOUR SUNDAY READING 

From 

HARNISH & SMITH'S 
CIRCULATING LIBRARY 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM.Y. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel ol 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



EATIN' IT! EATIN* IT! 

EVERYBODY'S EATIN' IT! 
EATIN' WHAT? 

Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 

_ - 

-at- 

"USSY'S" 

The Reason is it's Good 
Awful! Awful Good! 

For sale by 

A. S. MILLER 

Dealer in 
"GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 

W. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



COIiliEGE f~ZT2 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



§ 9*3 y 

ML Z> 



Volume IV. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October 1, 1912 



flo. 36 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Indians 45-L. V. 

Last Wednesday Lebanon Valley 
journeyed to Carlisle where the foot 
ball season was opened in a game with 
the Indians. We did not go up vvilh 
any hopes of winning so we were not 
disappointed at the score which was 
45-0. On the whole the boys played a 
better game than in recent years. 
They made several first downs and 
worked their forward passes success- 
fully. 

The redskins piled up thirty eight 
of their points in the first Half. In 
the second half they only crossed our 
line once. Evidently the boys 
suffered from a bad case of stage 
fright. 

One reporter says of Lebanon 
Valley : "The visitors showed stamina, 
made several fast runs, and the 
copper-colored warriors were almost on 
their goal line. Their forward pass- 
ing was also worked with effect." 

Snavely played a good game in his 
new positijn at left tackle. Pell at 
halfback showed ud well and made a 
strong bid for a permanent place on 
the team. Line-up : 

Carlisle Position L. V. 

Large left end Light 

Jarrlow left tackle Charlton 

Bergie left guard Mowery 

Calac centre Walters 

Bergie right guard Statton 

Lookaround right tackle Snavely 

Williams right end Dearolf 

Welih quarterback Larew 

Drscklin left halfback Strickler 

Wheelock right halfback Pell 

Broker fullback Dayhoff 

Touchdowns— Broker, 2; Bracklin, 
Wheelock, Welch, I Jronx, Broker. 
Orals from toudowns, Beigie, 2; 
Garh w. 

Referee — Harris, Harrisburg. 
Umpire, Paul Smith, Bucknell. 
Head linesman. Lonestar, Carlisle. 
Time — ■ lour nine-minute periods. 



ALL ANNVILLE IS 
FOR KR EIDER 



HUNDREDS PLEDGE HIM THEIR 
SUPPORT AT BIG RATIFI- 
CATION MEETING 



PROMINENT MEN SPEAK 



Meeting Held in College Chapel; Suff- 
ragetts in Audience; Kreider De- 
clares His Principles — Glee Club 
Sings and Washington Band Plays 
If the enthusiasm and support of 
Annville voters and the men of Leba- 
non Valley college will have anything 
to do with the election of A. S. 
Kreider to Congress in November, 
then judging from the meeting in the 
college chapel last evening when Mr. 
Kreider was ratified by men of every 
political party and assured of their 
hearty support, he will be elected by 
the biggest majority ever given a 
Congressicnal aspirant from this 
district. 

Never in a hundred years had 
Annville seen such enthusiasm, such 
signs of moral and political support 
evinced for one of her sons as was 
shown at last night's meeting. Every 
one of the hundreds of voters who 
crowded the large auditorium to its 
doors was for Kreider, if the cheering 
which greeted the future Congressman 
when he arrived at the meeting may 
be taken as a gauge of the general 
feeling. 

The meeting was conducted on 
absolutely non-partisan lines. Men 
from every political party realizing 
the honor which has been conferred on 
Annville. feeling Ihe betterment 
( 'ontinued on page 2 



The Star Course 

The Star Course Committees of 
the Christian Associations have 
scheduled the following numbers for 
the Star Course of this year : 

Walter P'ccles and the College Girls 
-Nov. 15 

The Dixie Chorus— Dec. 14 

Dr. Wm. Colledge— Jan. 29. 

The Hussars— Feb. 15. 

The Waterman Concert Company 
—Mar 25 

The course is contracted from the 
Redpath Lyceum Bureau from whom 
we have always had good service, and 
the promises for this schedule are 
especially good. We desire and re- 
quest the kind patronage of every stu- 
dent and friend of the school. 

In the near future, you will be 
visited by some member of the Com- 
mittee. Fork over the dough and get 
one or two tickets of admittance for 
the season. 



Members of 1 9 1 2 

A. S. Beckley is preaching on the 
Grantville circuit, and lives in Ann- 
ville. 

Oliver Butterwick is teaching in the 
high school, at Hersey, Pa. 

Virginia Miller is teaching in Br.vn 
Mawr, Pa. 

Esther Schell will spend the winter 
at her home in Meyerstown. 

Earl Carmany is teaching Mythology, 
Science, and directing athletics in 
the George H. Thurston School in 
Pittsburgh. 

Samuel 0. Grimm is at the head of 
the Academy Department of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Clair F. Harnish is in the auto- 
mobile business, with his father, at 
Mechanicsburg. Pa. 

John Wesley Ischey is taking post 
graduate work at Princeton. 

Forest S Hensel is in the clothing 
Continued on pa^e 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuis 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
G. A. WILLIAMS, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 
A thletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 
VICTOR MIJLHOLLEN, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
C. L. SHEPLEY 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to a jj 

other matter to Room — . Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

One of the conclusions reached at an 
educational committee meeting was, 
that "the average amount of study is 
discreditably small." The reports 
indicate that the average amount of 
work done by an under-graduate is less 
than three and a half hours a week 
preparation for a three hour subject. 
Then if a student carries twelve 
hours a week he will spend fourteen 
hours in preparation. Thus twenty-six 
hours represents his or her scholastic 
labors ; of course this amount varies, 
for a few sptnd not over an hour a 
week in preparation for a course of 
three hours, while othes spend be- 
tween seven and eight hours. 

Men and women who enter college, 
ought to have wisdom enough to know 
what they want, and have strength 
enough to get what they want. If 
they want the education of discipline 
they should have a chance to get it. 
If they want the education of culture, 
they should find those doors open to 
them. If they want the education 
of efficiency they should find it in the 
complex academic life. A condition 
must also be put on the seeker, if 
these opportunities are offered he 
must give his labor for their attain- 
ment. 



College means far more than books* 
recitations, and study. Professor Hall 
of Harvard gives this definition "Col- 
lege is a place for high aims, high 
opportunities and high spirits. " It is 
a place for work, but also for free- 
dom, fcr'association, for good-fellow- 
ship. Songs do not originate in pro- 
fessional schools. Coming between 
the long drill of school and the long 
warfare of professional life, college is 
peculiarly the place for elasticity of 
mind, for election, for growth of pur- 
pose." It may be stated also the 
college is set not to give men or 
women of eighteen or twenty years of 
age what they want, but what they 
ought to want. If a man or women is 
content with an education which con- 
sists simply of intellectual conditions 
and which is not impressed by in- 
telldctual forces, he has missed a 
great opportunity. The individual 
loses himself if he or she refuses to 
regard the college as a place for train- 
ing in thinking. Many graduates re- 
gret that their college failed to oblige 
them to read the best books, and to 
give hard thinking to hard subjects. 
How much of that regret can we place 
to the individual's own neglect? 

In the words of Charles F. Thwing, 
L.L. D., "Going to college and work- 
ing little is good, goiog to college and 
working much is better, very good. 
One need3 simply to consult and fol- 
low the laws of value First things 
are to be made first, and secondary 
things are to be made second. The 
college student should, indeed, be 
other than a student. But he should, 
at least, be a student, and a hard one, 
too." 

Members of 1 9 1 2 

(Continued from page 1) 

business with his father at Lykens, 
Pa. 

Donald C. Keister is taking a 
course in business at the University 
of Pittsburgh. 

Ira D. Lowery and Chester E. 
Rettew are taking work at Bonebrake 
Theological Seminary. 

Samuel B. Plummer is principal of 
the High School at Ernmitsburg, Md. 

Josiah F. Reed is teaching in 
the High School at Duncannon, Pa. 



C. C. Smith is teaching history in 
Eldridge Academy at Eldridge, Pa. 

Norman B. S. Thomas is preaching 
on the Mechanicsburg circuit of the 
Pennsylvania conference. 

Paul M. Vogt is teaching in the 
High School at Oakland City, Ohio. 

Guy Wingerd is teaching in the 
Galahad School for Boys, at Hudson, 
Wisconsin. 

Charles G. White is preaching on 
the Lingelstown- Rockville circuit, 
of the East Pennsylvania Conference 
and lives in Annville. 

Elizabeth Lau is teaching in the 
Red Lion High School, Red Lion Pa. 

Carrie Light has a position in the 
Educatonal Depa tment of the Boston 
Y. M. C. A. 

Nell Seltzer is teaching in Parks- 
burg High School, Parksburg, Pa. 

Edna Kilmer is at home in Reading. 

All Annville is for Kreider 

(Continued from page 1) 

which will come to the town in a 
political and business way by having 
one of their own townsman at 
Washington, joined in ratifying Mr. 
Kreider and in urging every voter 
to stand by him in the coming 
campaign. 

Addresses were made by Professur 
H. H. Shenk, professor ot history 
and political economy at Lebanon 
Valley; Prof. J. E. Lehman, pro- 
fessor of mathematics ; the Rev. H. 
B. Spayd, pastor of the Annville 
United Brethren church; the Rev. 
Paul D. Witman, pastor of the First 
Evangelical Lutheran church; Dr. 
D. M. Rank, a leader in the Washing- 
ton party: H. L. Kinports, one of the 
principal merchants of Annville; 
George Houtz, one of the employees 
of the Kreider shoe mid; George W. 
Stine, cashier of the Annville 
National bank; Samuel Grnybill, 
superintendent of the United Brethren 
Sunday school, and Alfred Mills, of 
the Annville Board of Health. 

All the speakers agreed that 
Kreider is the man for the place left 
vacant in Washington by Marlin E. 
Olmsted, of Harrisburg. And each 
man was hearty in his enthusiasm for 
Kreider and the principles which 
Kreider stands for. 

Mr. Kreider's address was the big 



COLLEGE NEWS 



feature of the evening. He was in- 
troduced by Professor Shenk after 
being brought to the meeting from his 
home by a special cummittee. 

Mr. Kreider declared that he stood 
for the passage of laws demanded by 
the progressive spirit of the countiy. 
Among other things he said he was 
for a protective tariff properly ad- 
justed, a workingman's compensation 
law, a labor law prohibiting young 
children and women from working in 
sweat shop mills, working man's 
pension law, and an employers' 
liability act. 

Time after time, Kreider was 
cheered by the Kreider warm crowd 
and with the Star Spangled Banner by 
the Washington band of Annville. the 
meeting came to a close. 

Features of the meeting were sing- 
ing by the College Glee Club, music 
by the Washington band, and the 
presence of a large number of women 
whom The Rev. Mr. Wifman 
humorously termed "dear suffra- 
gettes." A parade preceeded and 
followed the meeting in the chapel. 

SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

KALOZETEAN 
Current history, Clyde Eby ; General 
Nogi, I. L. Ressler; Quartette, P. L- 
Strieker, N. Fake, D. E. Young, F. 
E. Stengle Oration, G. A. Williams; 
Extempore, Examiner, Editor. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Current Even's, Robert Baaehore; 
Impromptu, P. F. Roberts; Debate: 
Resolved, That He Who Works His 
Way Through College is Better Fitted 
for Life, Than He Whose Bills Are 
Paid by Another. Affirmative, L. A. 
Rodes, C. Lynch; Negative, R. 
Weidler, Ed. Smith Piano solo, D. E. 
Zimmerman; The Worlds Series, R. 
Stickel. 

CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, Mary Spayd ; The World 
Today, Josephine Mathias; Andiew 
Lang, Viola Gruber; Sketch, Edith 
Lthman, Lottie Spessard ; Vocal solo, 
Catherine Bachman ; Progressive Plat- 
form, Sara Zimmerman; Piano soio, 
Vera Myers. 



Miss Josephine Mathias, '16 spent 
theweck end at tier home in High 
Spire. 



Calendar. 

Friday— Oct. 4, 7:15, Society meet- 
ings. 

Saturday— Oct. 5, Lebanon Valley 
and Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 

Sunday— Oct. 6. 1 o'clock, Joint 
Session, Missionary Program. 

Tuesday— Oct. 8, 7 o'clock, Prayer 
meeting. 

A Visit 

The Student Volunteer Band 
wishes to announce the visit of Miss 
Lucy Robinson, Student Volunteer 
Secretary, on Ocotber 8 and 9. Miss 
Robinson will speak to the students 
at prayer meeting on Tuesday, the 
eighth and if possible at chapel the 
next morning. She will personally 
inteview any student who wishes to 
speak to her, concerning the Volunteer 
Movement. Any person desiring to 
do so, should speak to Miss Clippinger, 
president of the Y. W. C. A. or any 
member of the band. Let us pray 
that her visit may be a blessing 
among us. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday afternoon 
was in charge of Misses Florence 
Clippinger and Edna Yarkers, the 
delegates to the Summer Conference, 
held at Eaglesmere, Pa. 

Miss Clippinger gave an excellent 
description of their trip and of the 
place. She also reported the series of 
lectures given by Dr. Ross on the 
Apostles Creed. This Creed, he says, 
is the fundamental thing in 
Christianity and the great bond be- 
tween all churches. 

Miss Yarkers reported the evening 
lectures given by Miss Conde, Drs. 
Tomkins and Palmer and Robeit E. 
Speer. The latter took as his theme 
"0, My God, My Soul is Cast Down 
Within Me," showing that the two 
notes of the Psalms, despair and hop?, 
are characteristics of our own lives. 

In the study classes. Miss 
Clippinger took up "Social Messages 
of Jesus" and Miss Yarkers, "Rural 
Problems" and Church History. 

Both of the girls succeeded in 
bringirg much of the inspiration of 
the conference to the Y. W. C. A. 

A committee to raise funds for 
next ytar's conference will be 
appo : nted shortly. 



You are correct If you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe* 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. H 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 



LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties* a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

For Cakes and Confectionery 
GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St, Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



|1 RECOPIJIIEPIITIOH BGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and 6 of our con tract 
refer respectively to KECOMMENDATION and 
NOTIFICATIONS vet this Agencv is alnv»c 
entirely a RECOMMENDATION AGENCY. Cilice 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
'"'I 

We give no time to hc-esay or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up. 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEG E N E W S 



SP 

| Items of Interest j 

Miss Florence E. Christeson spent 
Saturday, in Lebanon. 

Miss Helen E. Brightbill spent 
Friday evening with friends in 
Hersey. 

Mr. Fred D. Bolts, Ex-14, Con- 
servatory was visiting in town this 
week. 

Miss Nellie Buffington, '00 and Mr. 
Lewis Buffington, Ex-'09, spent Sun- 
day at the home of Prof. Schtoyer. 

Miss Edith Gingrich spent the week 
end with friends and relatives in 
Meclianicsburg, 

Miss Hope Renn, '16, of Middle- 
town visited her paren*s over Sunday. 

Miss Ethel Houser, 'lj, of Balti- 
more was called home, Wednesday, 
on account of the death of her grand- 
mother. 

Miss Lucy Seltzer and sister, Nell 
Seltzer, '12. were the guests of 
Misses Adams, Schmidt and Johnson, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Freed visited in Hershey. 

Miss Nellie Seltzer, '12, spent 
Saturday at school. 

F. E. Schaeffer, '10, spent several 
days last week in Annville, visiting 
friends and looking over foot ball pros- 
pects. He will leave for Johns 
Hopkins University this week, where 
he will continue his siudies. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting last Sunday was led 
by Russel Weidler, '14. He read 
part of the first chapter of St. John 
and based his "emarks on the 29th 
paragraph: "Behold the Lamb of 
God, Which Taketh Away the Sin of 
the World." The meeting was full 
of life and interest. Attendance 
pretty good. 

The Sunday coming, Oct. 6, will be 
joint session with the Y. W. C. A. 
A 6pecial program has been prepared. 
A good meeting is expected. All 
come. 



Fine New Cameras 

and 

All Kinds of Kodak Supplies 
HARNISH & SMITH 

The College Book Store 



The Sophomore Straw Ride 

On Thursday last, Sept. 6, in spite 
of the cloudy weather and muddy 
roads, the opS'nomores enjoyed a straw 
ride to Mt. Gretna. About two 
o'clock Thursday afternoon, bands of 
Soph youths and maidens were seen 
wending their waj toward Mose 
Light's livery stables. About 2:15 
the class of 191o got wise to the 
actives of 1915. Nine of the' Freshies 
tied up a Soph, but soon dispersed 
when two other S lphs came to rescue 
their brother. About 2:30 the Sophs 
got off happily with Miss Ma-y 
rhristeson, of town, as chaperon. 
The clouds wtre'nt as thick or the 
mud as deep as any one had expected, 
so the ride wa? delightful. At 
Gietna they stopped at KaufFman's 
where a large supper was done ample 
justice to. 'the menu was as follows: 

Chicken, stuffed 
lima beans sweet potatoes 

corn on ear waffles 
celery pepper slaw 

tomatoes apple pie 

ice cream grapes coffee 

After supper games and songs about 
a big open fire -place were enjoyed 
until the happy bunch set out on the 
home ride. With yells and songs for 
1915, they arrived in Annville about 
el even. The only srquel the story 
has is the speeches and 1915 yells of 
thfi Presides, too ' 'nerveless" to start 
a class-scrap. 

Recital 

Miss Schmidt, Head of the Voice 
Department, will give a recital, 
Thursday, October 17th. She will be 
assisted by Miss Adams, Professor 
of Oratory. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 

MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST- 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa, 



WHEN THINKING OF THAT 
GIRL BACK HOME GO TO 



"WSSY'S" AND EAT 
RUSS BROS. VELVET 
ICE CREAM 

IT IS JUST ABOUT AS SWEET 
AS SHE IS AND NEVER, 
NEVER FICKLE 

A. S. Miller W. Main St. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



As 



SCHOOL of V\ 
* ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 






Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty- 
Students as well as professional me 
may increase their efficiency by th 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING H0US 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

D >yton ( Ohio 



COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume IV 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, October 8, 1912 



Ho. 37 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Lebanon Valley O-Gettyshurg 6 

Blue and White Team GiOes Batttlefield Boys a Hard 
Fight— Official PreOents Scoreless Game 



In a game replete with thrills 
Lebanon Valley gave Gettjsburg the 
time of their life, on Saturday. 
Lebanon Valley took the strongest 
team that has ever defended the Blue 
and White, to Gettysburg. Much 
dissatisfaction is felt at the manner'in 
which the game was won. Gettys-* 
burg baa always had a reputation 
for giving visiting teams a raw deal. 
In the opinion of nearly all present 
the decision of the referee was rank. 
The final play which resulted in the 
touchdown was illegal from every 
point cf view. In the fir&t place 
Gettysburg pushed Scheffer over the 
line, then Lebanon Valley pushed him 
back again. At this stage the referee 
blew his whistle announcing that the 
ball was dead and at the same time 
declaring a touchdown for Gettysburg. 
When the touchdown was scored the 
ball was two feet in front cf the goal. 

Very little enthusiasm was mani" 
fested in the Gettysburg stands at this 
apparently poor decision. 

The first quarter opened with 
Gettysburg kicking off to Lebanon 
Valley. The ball was kept pretty 
much in the centre of the field. The 
quarter ended with the ball in Gettys- 
burg's possession on their twenty yard 
line. 

The second quarter was a repetition 
of the first. Each team evened up 
in.carrying the ball. Our line held, 
although Gettysburg was considerably 
the heavier, and neither side could 
do anything in that direction. 
Gettysburg could not do much in the 
f,r st half around the ends while 
Lebanon Valley gained consistently. 
Th e second quarter ended witn the 



bali in our possession on Gettysburgs 
twenty-five yard line. 

The second half opened with Gettys- 
burg receiving. They were soon 
forced to kick. Lebanon Valley could 
do nothing and soon kicked. Gsttys- 
burg advanced to our one-yard line 
where we held them for downs. 
Dearolf kicked and Lebanon Valley 
recovered the ball. The quarter ended 
with the ball in our possession. 

In the last quarter Gettysburg 
started with much vigor. They in- 
tercepted a forward pass and started 
down the field. The ball was rapidly 
advanced to our gpal, Lebanon 
Valley made several vain attempts to 
stop it. I was at this time that the 
referee scored the touchdown which 
gave the game to Gettysburg. The 
battle-field men failed to kick the 
goal. Only two mtriut~s of play re- 
main. Gettyburg kicked off. Leb- 
anon Valley rushed the ball to the 
twenty yard line when the game was 
called. Final sore Gettysburg 6, 
Lebanon Vallev 0. 

The line up : 
L. V. Positions GETTYSBURG 
Dearolf left end Dulehohn 
Charlton left tackle Nichola 
Mowery left guard McCulleough 
Statton centre Shaffer 

Conder right guard Snyder 
Suavely right tackle Beck 
Kirkpatrick right end Brumbaugh 
Lerew quarterback Hoar 

Deyhoff fullback Beagle 

Strickler left halfback Myers 
Pell ' right halfback Scheffer 

Substitutes— Spangler tor Dulebohn, 
Dulebohn for Nicholas, Beard tor 
McCullough, Wright for Shaffer, 
Diehl for Snyder, Altemose for Brum- 
baugh, Miller for Myers. Touchdown 
Continued on page 2 



Mathematical Round Table 

The first meeting of the Mathe- 
matical Round Table for the year was 
held Wednesday night, Oct. 1. 

The following program was render- 
ed : "Algebraic Fallacies", Clara 
Horn; "Biography of Descartes",. 
Faber Stengle; "Zero and Infinity, 
Lester Rodes. The papers were in- 
teresting and the discussions which 
followed even more so. The new 
members received were Prof. Peters, 
Eilzabeth Reichard, Paul Bowman, 
Boaz Light, Philo Statton and Faber 
Stengle. 

The meetings of the Round Table 
are held the last Wednesady night of 
each month. It is urged that more 
of the students attend. 

It is the purpose of the Round Table 
not only to instruct and interest, but 
to keep one up-to-date in the thirgs oj 
the 'mathematical world'. 



Glee Club Trip 

Last Thursday President Gossard 
attended the East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference held at Ephrata. He was 
acccmpanied by Alfred K. Mills, 
Prof. Sheldon, and the college cctette. 
The octette which was composed of 
Rodes and T. Lyter first tenors, 
Young and Statton second tenors, 
Weidler and Weaver first basses and? 
Klinger and Charlton second basses, 
sang several selections for the Con- 
ference. The boys also visited the 
Monastery which is located at 
Ephrata. 

Shepley, the business manager of 
the "News" visited the Conference, 
and obtained about fifty new sub- 
scriptoins. 

The Glee Club will go to the 
Pennsylvania conference this week. 



Van B. Dayhoff, '15 spent Sunday 
at Gettysburg renewing old acquain r 
tances. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VrOTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

( LARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 
IVAN Li. RESSLER, '13 

General 
J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 

Assistants 
BARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Lebanon Valley has had its weak- 
nesses, does have today. But what 
institution of any importance has not! 
It is going through the crisis, which 
gives strength and power to any 
college. Lebanon Valley's existence 
is due to the inexaustible supply of 
power that has been hers from the 
time of organization. 1 hanks to the 
powers that have kept us alive. "To 
him that overcometh shall be given a 
crown of lite." This is as vital 
today as it was two thousand years 
ago. Who does not know that it often 
takes the sacrifice of generation 
after generation to establish a repu- 
tation ? 

What is our joy then, when we see 
some real and valuable improvements 
presented. Not an honest and worthy 
student will hesitate to cry hurrah 
when they see the interest that is 
manifested in athletics. College spiiit 
rose instantaneously. Every one feels 
today that this step is decidedly up to 
date, and will be a great factor in 
helping Lebanon Valley's standing 
with other colUges. Foot ball is the 
college game and the prospects of L. 



V. this year look very favorable, in 
fact we ae going to have a successful 
season. The spirit which exists 
among the students and the interest 
taken by the President and faculty 
cannot help but bring courage, vi^or 
and confidence to the team, and be an 
important factor in bringing success. 

There is another activity we wish 
to mention and emphasize in this issue 
of the NtiWS, that is a college debat- 
ing team. There are many reasors 
why we should have a debating team 
and not any why we should not have 
it. It is the philosophv of life that 
what you do not use you cannot keep. 
We have the debating art developed to 
some degree. Let us not lose what 
we have accomplished, but use it in 
such a way as to bring some credit to 
our Amla Mater If you are interested 
don't be afraid to make it known. You 
will interest others by doing so and 
help to crrate some spirit to carry 
out the idea. Debating is the main 
feature of our literary societies and 
why do we not have the chance to 
make a good showing. 

We hope ycu will give this some 
consideration and fondly anticipate 
many more such gradual and sound 
efforts at improvement of the name 
and character of our Alma Mater. 

FOOT BALL 

Continued from page I 

— Scheffer. Referee— Graff Western 
Maryland. Umpire — Beidleman, 
Gettybsurg. Timek-eper — Rice, 
Gettysburg. 

Gridironets 

Some game. 

The boys played the game like 
gentleman and deserve great praise. 

Larew played a great game at 
quarterback and made several brilliant 
tackles. 

"Only Lebanon Valley" the cry of 
the Gettysburg students before the 
game was somewhat different after 
the first quarter. 

Dayfoff stopped Gettysburg's line 
bucks. 

Lebanon Valley's backfield is th e 
best that ever wore the blue and 
white. 

Mowery at guard was in every play. 



Statton in his new position a 
center, made good. 

Competent officials seem to be 
minus quantity at one or two of ou 
Pennsylvania institutions. 

Work hard for Albright on the 19th. 
It is the game we have to win. 

Mass meetings will begin this 
week. Come on with your songs and 
yells. 

Ihe team deserves the most hearty 
support of each student. Co ire out 
to practice and cheer the boys along. 

Delaware at Newark, cn Saturday, 
we are going to bring back the pig. 
skin. Everybody come out and work, 
we cannot do anything without the 
scrubs. They are an absolute 
necessity. 

The end runs of atrickler were the 
features of Saturday's game. 



Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Join 
Session 

Hie Christian Associations helJ 
their first joint session last Sunday. 
Mr. Charjes Arndt, '14. lead the 
meeting. The subject for the hour 
was "United Brethren Missions in 
Foreign Lands " Miss Edna Yark- 
ers, '13 gave an interesting account 
of our work in China. Miss Sara 
Zimmerman very creditably showed 
what progress we have made in Ja 
pan, and what remains yet to ac- 
complish. Mr. L. A. Rodes, '1- 
favored the audience with an ap- 
propriate vocal solo. He was accom- 
panied by Miss Velma Heindel. 
Tha next period was devoted to an 
outline of our work in Porto Rica an 
the Philippine Islands by Paul Bow- 
man, '15. Our work in Africa was 
then biiefly sketched by the leader, 
Mr. Arndt. 

The meeting was an interesting one. 
Thirty-eight weie present AU 
come every Sunday. 



Conservatory Notes 

The Conservatory students enjoye 
a hike to Lebanon Wednesday even- 
ing. Th)se in the party were Misse 
Ellis, Heindel, Ryland, Quigley and 
Mark, Messrs. Strickler, Charleton 
Oleweiler, Dayhoff and Rhine. [Vlia 
May Christeson was chaperon. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, Miriam Ellis: The Rural 
Problem and the Countty Minister, 
Esther Heintzelman ; Reading, 
Josephine Urich; Vocal solo, Rith 
Quigley ; Problems of the Home, 
Blanche Risser; Olive Branch, Editor; 
Piano duet, Lottie Spessard, Edith 
Lehman. 

PHILOKOSMAIN 
Pen Points. C. Curry; Oration, G. 
L. B'ouch; Debate: Resolved, That 
the Newspapers do More to Mould 
Public Opinion rhan all Other Agencies 
Combined. Affirmative D. B. Base- 
hore, M. H. Wert. Negative, Leh- 
man Leister, V. D. Mulhollen; Harp 
solo, L. A. Rodes; Boy Scouts, 
Raymond Arndt; Interview. Kiinger 
and Reddick ; Living Thoughts, 
Editor. 

K A.LOZETEAN 
Our National Parks, J, A. Water; 

Extempore, ; Piano solo, 

P. L. Strickler; Debate: Resolved, 
That it would be a Good Proposition 
for Leoanon Valley College to Borrow 
Money, an! Build a Gymnasium. 
Affirmative, H H. Charlton, D. M. 
Long Negative, Harry Bender, I. S. 
Ernst, Musical Number, A. D. 
Medsger; Paper, C. E. Mutch; 
Chorus, Society. 



Chapel Reconstruction 

One result of the happy frame of 

JIMJ « : : ■ :< i . V 
mind which L. V. has assumed, can 

be seen by taking a peep inside the 

chapel doors any time between 8:45 

and y a. rn. Instead of bunches of 

whispering and careless students, 

clustered here a^d there, one sees a 

more orderly and carefully arranged 

student body, gathered there with a 

rreater possibility of executing the 

Purpose for which such a service is 

l eld. The faculty also will be seen 

on the ros rum. occupjing places more 

worthy of their positions, than the 

back row which should he kept only 

for naughty children. 

The student body entirely sanctions 

tr »e change and feels that to such a 

service they need not be ashamed to 

bring visitors and strangers. 

Professor and Mrs. Grimm spei t 
tf ie week-end in Red Lien. 



Freshman Feed 

Last Monday evening, Sept. 2yth, 
the Freshmen left Annville very 
quietly for Palmyra. They met in 
Greiner's Hall, which was decorated 
very prettily held in the colors of the 
class, where the 'spread' was held. 
Evereybody was in the best of spirits 
and the evening passed very 
pleasantly. When they returned and 
awakened theoccupants of the [two 
dorms with their yells, it was to let 
them know that they were 
still alive. Oh! those Sophs not 
a word did they know of it, and not 
a word did they say about it, but oh! 
how glum they looked about it. 

Miss May Belle Adams acted as 
chaperon. 



Items of Interest 




Mrs. Quigley, of Red Lion, spent 
Saturday and Sunday with her daugh- 
ter, Ruth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Craig, of Chambers- 
burg, were the guest of Esther 
Heintzelman, Thursday. 

Miss Adams. Miss Johnson and 
Miss Schmidt, spent Saturday in 
Philadelphia. 

The following girls spent Saturday 
and Sunday at their homes: Florence 
Clippinger, '13 Belle Orris, '15 

Select your Fountain 
Pen out of 4 dozen new 
ones at the 

HARNISH & SMITH 

Book and Stationery Store 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST- 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing ncately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa, 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe* 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
F»artie» a Specialty 
I I. K. LONG & SON 

Rear Keigle Hotel Annville, F"a 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO' 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

"Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'ENI STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

fl REGOrniilENDHTION AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and C of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATION ana 
NOTIFICATIONS, vet this Agencv is almost 
entirely a RECOMMENDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business. 1905, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time to he esay or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up. 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R, L. MYERS. & CO., 
Lcmoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Ruth and Larene Erigle, 15, Mary 
Daugherty, '16, Hope Renn, '16. 

Professor Sheldon gave a surprise 
party for Mrs. Sheldon, Wednesday 
evening. Those present: were Miss 
Schmidt, Miss Adams, Miss Johnson, 
Miss Seltzer and Mrs. Grimm. 

Miss Sara Zimmerman, '13 attended 
the Golden Wedding Anniversary of 
her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Elliot, in Reading recently. 

Quite a number of the boys at- 
tended the Conference Sessions at 
Ephrata, Pa. 



A Hiking Club 

Harken ye! All those interesfpd 
in the organization of a Hikers Cub, 
keep eyrs and ears open for further 
announcements concerning the forma- 
tion of the same. Several requests 
have been sent in, asking that the 
matter be put before the students. 
Let us all be "fresh air kids" and 
start on the road to " Well-ville. " 
Further announcements will be made. 



Personals 

Reddick, '14, Mutch, '14, Stickell, 
'15, Hartz, '16 and Prof. Wanner 
journeyed to Gettysburg Saturday to 
see the game. 

Stick* 11, '15, Snavely, '15, and 
gtatton, '25, stopped of at Diilsburg 
over Sunday with Larevv, who visited 
his parents. 



Mr. Roger B. Haitz. '08, is study- 
ing in Cotnell University. 

Mis. G. R. Kreidei, Jr , a Con- 
servatory graduate has been suffering 
at her home in Annville with a badly 
fractured arm. 

Max F. Lehman, '07, who received 
his degree of M. A. at the University 
of Pennsylvania last June 1 , is teaching 
Mathematics in the Baltimore Poly- 
technic Institute. 

Miss Edith N. Freed, MO spent 
Saturday and Sunday with her mother 
in Annville. 

Miss Edna D. Yeatts, '09, is teach- 
ing in the High School at Canton, Pa. 

jCebanon 7/ a /lei/ 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalog ue 
ttev. S. *D. Sossard, ZPros/dcr.t 
jfnnvi/lej !Pa. 




Miss Helen Weidler's name was 
omitted from "members of^ 1912" 
last week. We wish to make the 
correction. She is leaching in High 
Bridge, N. J. 

Mr. Clair Harnish, '12, was a 
visitor in town recently. 

Miss Ora M. Harnish, '06, Princi 
pal of the Burd School, located at 
Philadelphia, spent a day in Annville 
last week, visiting Mrs. G. 
Kreider. 

John Karl Lehman, '11, is at the 
University of Pennsylania taking 
work in the department of chemical 
engineering. 



DAYTON, O. 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

I. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2i The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence Riven to "Religious pedagogy." o 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

-For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



WHEN THINKING OF THA 
GIRL BACK HOME GO TO 



"USSY'S" AND EAT 
RUSS BROS. VELVET 
ICE CREAM 

IT IS JUST ABOUT AS SWEE 
AS SHE IS AND NEVER, 
NEVER FICKLE 

A. S, Miller W. Main 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

SCHOOL of \\ 



ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

TROY, INLY. 



Send for a Catalogue. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, 51.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



**** 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty- 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



COLLEGE fiEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume IV. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October 15, 1912 



fio. 38 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 18T9. 



NO SCORE AT 
[ STATE 




LACK OF TEAM WORK PREVENTS 
LEBANON VALLEY FROM 
SCORING 



SLUGGING MARS GAME 

Mowery, Strickler, Dayhoff and Dear- 
olf Star — Lerew Handles 
Team Well 

Lenanon Valley and Delaware 
State battled to a tie score Saturday 
afternoon "on the college field at 
Newark, Delaware. For the first 
time in a number of years the team 
returned home in the evening un- 
defeated by that team. 

Although the game resulted itf a 
tie, members, of the team and the 
coaches are disappointed over the 
poor showing of the team as they 
outplayed the Delaware men in every 
stage of the game. But for the lack 
of team work L. V. C. would have 
defeated Delaware by two or three 
touchdowns. Unseasonable weather 
contributed to the other faults of the 
players on both sides. 

The game was marred by slugging 
by both teams, several of the players 
being removed from the game. In 
the last quarter Delaware made a 
rally and succeeded in keeping the 
Lebanon men on the defense. 
Throughout the other three quarters, 
our men carried the ball at will, 
scoring more first downs in one 
quarter, than their opponents made 
during the entire game. 

For Lebanon Valley, Strickler, 
Mowery, Dayhoff, and Dearolf played 
the best games. Lerew outgeneraled 
Continued on page 2 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Oct. 15h, at, 6 p. m.— 
Prayer Meeting. 

Thursday, Oct. 17th, 7:45— Song 
Recit. 

Friday, Oct. 18th, 7 :15 -Literary 
Society meetings. 

Saturday, Oct. 19th-Albright at 
Annvillle. 

Sunday, Oct. 20th, 1:15-Y. W. 
and Y. M. C. A. 



WILL LEBANON 

VALLEY WIN ? 

LEBANON VALLEY WILL WIN IS 
CONSENSUS OF OPINION 



A German Club 

During the past week another or- 
ganization has sprung into existence— 
der deutche Klubb. Feeling that such 
an organization would be helpful to 
students of German, Professor 
Seltzer 'presented the matter to her 
classes who were delighted with the 
project. The meetings will be held 
once a month. Original papers in 
German will be read, German poetry 
aecited and German songs sung. 

The most important feature how- 
ever will be the strictly German con- 
versation. 

The officers elected at the first 
meeting are as follows: President, 
Mr. Carl Schmidt; Vice President, 
Mr. Thomas Lyter; Secretary, Miss 
Helen Brightbill; Treasurer, Mr. 
Lawrence Shepley; Pianist, Miss 
May Meyer 



Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting Sunday afternoon was 
led by V. D. Mulhollen, '13. He 
took for his theme ''Thankfulness to 
God for His Blessings to Ua." He 
read as a scripture lessen the Psalm, 
103 and based his remarks on it. 

These ^beautiful Sundays seem to 
offer too great an inducement for out- 
door life tn secure a large attendance 
at Y. M. C. .A. We do not find 
fault with the boys, but wish to say, 
welcome to all. 



Will Lebanon Valley win on Sat- 
urday ? 

"Yes," say the enthusiastic. Yes," 
say the optimistic. And "yes" say the 
pessimistic. Yes, then, must be the 
answer. 

However chances for victory depend 
upon a decided brace on the part of 
every man on the team. Lack of 
team work, it is declared, was the 
only reason that Delaware was not 
decisively defeated last Saturday. 
Too much individual playing, not 
enough concerted action,— this was 
why Lebanon Valley failed to score 
at Newark according to those who 
saw the game. 

Albright is playing football this 
year,— real football. They are hold- 
ing teams like Ursinus and F. and M. 
to scores which show "Pop" Kelchner 
has a husky bunch at Myerstown, and 
that his huskies know how to advance 
the pig-skin. 

Albright is heavy this year, heav- 
ier than Lebanon Valley. To win, 
our fellows will have to depend on 
speed and unified action. Can Coach 
Pritchard whip the team into a sin- 
gle, fast, fighting machine by Saturday 
afternoon? If he can, Lebanon Val- 
ley will win. If he~can not, Albright 
will go home all puffed up and the 
bon-fires will be burned at Myerstown 
instead of at Annville. 

Of course everybody will go to see 
the game. And everybody will go 
with open throats. Tom Lyter, cheer 
leader, will lead the noise and noise 
helps when [it comes from the 
bleachers. 



COLL EG E NEWS 



College fiecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 
Assistants 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 



Address all business communications 

to . a n 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Does the college student live in a 
world of his own? Is he an isolated 
individual, and not a member of or- 
dinary society? Are the rules of 
conduct and moral action not just as 
applicable to him as to the wage- 
earner, the business man or the boy 
on the farm? 

These are questions which the col- 
lege student in the" present day might 
be called upon to consider and answer 
for himself. In college life so many 
unique situations arise, so many pecu- 
liar problems are presented. And to 
these come so many varied solutions 
and such different answers that the 
whole matter becomes quite complex. 

An incident of some unusual and 
doubtful character occurs in the 
loutine of school life; the many inter- 
ested people discuss it from various 
viewpoints. Some easily pardon, 
some carelessly disregard, and others 
entirely dissaprove and all may qu' te 
openly show their respective attitudes. 
In such a conflict as must follow, it 
is necessary that everyone take some 
stand. 



But how are we to judge of the 
incident :— according to the unwritten 
laws of college custom, accumulated 
during past and present experience, 
or by the one right code of morals 
laid down by the Greatest Ethical 
Teacher. Is not the student included 
among those of whom it was said, 
"By then fruits shall ye judge all 
men." Can we separate ourselves 
from the outer world when it comes 
to a question of right and wrong? 
Must we not apply the same principles 
of living to ourselves now as we 
expect to apply ten years hence? 

These questions we should answer 
carefully for ourselves and then let 
the solution be the guide of our every 
day actions. Boldly seek to know 
and to do the right, the pure and the 
noble. Only this can bring about the 
perfect college, the perfect society— a 
conscientious sense of individual re- 
sponsibility, 

"You in your small corner, 
And I in mine." 



NO SCORE AT 

DELAWARE STATE 



(Continued from page 1) 



his opposing quarterback and ran back 
the punts well, gaining from ten to 
thirty yards on each punt. Mowery 
played especially well making more 
tackles than several of the back field 
men, Cann, Hirshman, and Carswell 
starred for Delaware. 

The Philadelphia "Press" says: 
"The game was loosely played and 
uninteresting. Slugging was frequent 
between the players and neither team 
seemed to exert themselves," 

More team work is necessary for 
Saturday's game in order that the 
team may run up a largo score on 
Albright. Tlie lineup: 
LEBANON VALLEY DELAWARE 
Dearolf L. E. Schittler 

Charleton L. T. E. Loomis 

Mowery L. G. Kelly 

Statton (Walter) C. Crethers 
Gondor R. G. Vandergriff 

(Pepper) 

Snavelv R T. Hean 

Light (Kirkpatrick) R. E. S. Goomis 
Lerew Q, B. Huston 

Strickler L. H. B. Hirshmin 

Pell R. H B. Cann Taylor 

Dayhoff F. B. Carwell, Rudolp 



FRESHIES FLEE 

TO THE MTS 



The Freshmen surprised the Sophs 
Monday afternoon in manner cruel and 
unseemly. For the second time in 
two weeks they strolled unmolested 
away for an afternoon's outing. 

Seeing that their "guardians" 
wer« uninclined to guard, the first 
year men crawled into a big straw 
wagon on Main street and went to the 
mountain for chestnuts. 

Chestnut gathering, strolling in 
groups of two, and a delightful 
luncheon spread in the open were fea- 
tures of the afternoon. 

Hearing yells when the Freshme 
returned last evening, the Sophs who 
were too nonchalant to break up the 
party before it left, now came out. 
While one braver than the rest held 
the horses, another still braver, put 
the brakes on the wagon. 

By a few sharp cracks of a whip in 
the air, the Sophs were put to 
flight. The Freshies left .the wagon 
at the Eagle hotel and gave a yell. 
They then returned peaceably to their 
rooms. Many of the Sophs, it is said, 
were boning for "tests," —mental 
rather than physical. 

Mrs. Shroyer chaparoned the party. 



Y. W. C. A. 

A particularly interesting meeting 
was held in the parlors on Sunday 
afternoon, Miss Horn^leading the ser- 
vice. The topic was "My Body, a 
Living Temple" and the Scripture 
lesson way found in Paul's letter to 
the Corinthians. The^ remarks which 
the leader made upon the subject 
were direct and forceful and fille 
with truth. She spoke of our bodie 
as wonderful gifts from God, fo 
which we must care in our youth, s 
that later in life we may still poses 
the means and ability to assist in th 
c?rrying out of God's plans for th 
world. The attendance was good 
and a deep interest in the subject wa 
shown by all present. 

The girls seem to feel the influ- 
ence of Miss Robinson's visit and ar 
doing much to assist in the Associa 
tion work. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

KALOZETEAN 

Current events, N. Fake; James 
Thorpe, Victor rieffelfinger ; Piano 
solo, Faber Sttngle; Oration, C. Y. 
TJlrich;Duet, C. L. Shepley, T. B. 
Lyter; Original story, Carl Schmidt; 
Examiner, Editor; Chorus, society. 
CLIONIAN 

Piano solo Edith Gingrich ; Paper, 
Belle Orris; Sketch, J. Urich, Cath- 
arine Bachman; Quartette, Florence 
Christeson, Ruth Quigley, Helen 
Brightbill, Mary Spayd; Book Review, 
Larene Engle; My Trip Abroad, Dora 
Ryland; Chorus, society. 

PHILOKOSMAIN 

The Railaphone, S. Huber Heinzle- 
man; Parody, Philo A. Statton; De- 
bate: Resolved, That The Right of 
Franchise Should be Based Upon 
Educational Qualifications. Affirma- 
tive, John H. Ness, Leray B. 
Harnish. Negative, Lester Snyder, 
Carl G. Snavelyy; Harp solo, Lester 
Rodes; Our Police Disease, Russel 
Hoffer; I'm the Guy. Sedic Rine. 



Personals 

C. Y. Ulrich, Victor Heffelfinger, 
and C. E. Mutch made a business trip 
to Avon, on Saturday. 

C. L. Shepley spend Sunday with 
his parents in Harrisburg. 

Charlton spent Sunday afternoon 
in Hebron. 

Miss Charlotte Fisher, '05 and 
sister visited in Annville, on Satur- 
day. 

The professor of voice culture, 
Miss Gertrude Katharine Schmidt will 
give a recital on Thursday evening at 
7:45 in the Chapel. She will be as- 
sisted by Miss Adams, professor of 
oratory and Professor Sheldon Director 
of the Conservatory. 

Misses Johnson and Seltzer spent 
Saturday at Gettysburg. 

Misses Yarkers, Gingrich and Ora B. 
Bachman spent Satuday and Sunday in 
Middletown with Mis3 Mary Nissley. 
Miss Yarkers reed several selections 
and Miss Ginrgich sang several solos 
at the S. S. Rally service in the U. 
B. Church. 

G. A. Williams, '13 and V. W. 
Jamison, '15 made addresses at an 



Interdenominational L Y. P. C. E. 
meeting in St. Paul's Evangelical 
church, on Sunday. 

Prof. Wanner went to Delaware 
wiih the team to see the game, on 
Saturday. 

Prof. Derickson spent Saturday in 
Harrisburg. 

Don't forget the recital by Miss 
Schmidt and Miss Adams, on Thurs- 
day evening at eight o'clock. 



Biological Field Club 

The Biological Field Club held its 
first monthy meeting Wednesday 
evening October 9, in the Biological 
class room. "Typhus" the recently 
discovered, but invisible disease germ 
was very ably discussed by Mr. 
Ressler. Mr. Williams gave a very 
interesting and accurate report on 
"The Feeding Habits of the Catei- 
pillar. " Prof. Derickson added to 
the interest and educational profit of 
the of the evening by telling some- 
thing of the life history of the tomato 
worm. He also made the members 
of the club acquainted with a number 
of common, but not very familiar, 
weeds of this vicinity. 

All in all the evening was veiy 
pleasantly and profitably spent. The 
club meets the first Wednesday even- 
ing of each month. Topics of inter- 



Root! Root! Root! 

Get your Megaphones, 
Arm-Bands, Pennants, 
Canes and Horns, be- 
fore the Game at the 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST- 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

W, D, ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 



LIVERY 

Kirst Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 
M. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO« 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St, Annville, Pa, 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

■'Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

EB AN ON, PA. 

RJMiTrAH! boys eat 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



H KEGOlUPiEPjlTIDN AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and G of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATION and 
NOTIFICATIONS, vet this Agencv is almost 
entirely a RECOMMENDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 11)05, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time to heresay or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up" 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYERS & CO,, 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following address: 



Name 
Street 
City ■ 



State 



est to every one and especially to 

lovers of biology, will be discussed. 

Members are solicited and visitors 
are welcome 

The Visit of Miss Robinson 

Miss Robinson, a travelling Sec- 
retary of the Student Volunteer 
Movement, was a guest of the Y. W. 
C. A,, Tuesday and Wednesday of the 
past week. She spoke in chapel 
Tuesday, using as her subject, "The 
New Geography." The changes, 
which are taking place in China, 
India, Africa, and Japan, are ful- 
filling God's, Statement," "I Shall 
Create a New Heaven and a New 
Earth." What does this new geo- 
graphy mean to us, as Christian Stu- 
dents? Where can you spend your life 
most profitably, was her final plea. 

Miss Robinson also made the 
address in prayer meeting. 

She took for her theme not the 
needs of the world but the needs of 
Christ. She said that Christ needs 
men and women to-day with a three- 
fold character, namely, a strong 
hatred of sin; men and women whom 
he can use as examples; men and 
women whom he can send as his 
messengers. 

She then compared the number of 
disciples gathered in the little upper 
room in Jerusalem with the number 
of students at our prayer meeting, 
and contrasted their influence with 
what ours will be if we follow the 
call of the Master. 

She showed, too, how Christ, while 
on earth, must have longed for the 
close companionship of friends; how 
much of his time was spent in soli- 
tude. The same condition prevails 
today; Christ wants them who will 
keep close companionship with him. 
This fellowship is marked by genuine 



love for God. 

If we fulfil these conditions as 
Christ fulfilled them, we shall have 
a strong hatred for sin we shall be 
living exampeles for him, and then, 
only, can he use us effectively as true 
messengers in his service. 

An informal reception was given 
Miss Kobinson by the \. W. C. A. 
Tuesday evening, from seven to 
eight. 

jCebcinon 7/cilley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
Sftev. S. 7). Sossarcfj {President 
jfnnville, SPa. 

BOflEBK THEOLOGICAL 



DAYTON, O, 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy'' o 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



WHEN THINKING OF THAT 
GIRL BACK HOME GO TO 



TOY'S" AND EAT 
RUSS BROS. VELVE 
ICE CREAM 

IT IS JUST ABOUT AS SWEE 
AS SHE IS AND NEVER, 
NEVER FICKLE 

A, S. Miller W. Main St. 

$100 Typewriter $32.5! 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as goc 
as new with a full year's guaranty 
Students as well as professional mer 
may increase their efficiency by tl 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 
- Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUS 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 

WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Streei. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



SCHOOL of V 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COIiliEGE JifiWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume IV. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, October* 22, 1912 



Ho. 39 



Entered as .second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post ofilee at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



L I C. 







OF 

[, 10 TO 7 



ALBRIGHT DEFEATED BY LEBAN- 
ON, VALLEY'S WHIRLWIND 
FINISH 



THE BEST TEAM WON 

Our Boys Played Defensive First Three 
Quarters; Then They Slaught- 
ered Albright 

BIG BONFIRE IN EVENING 



In a game pronounced by many well 
known critics, to have been the best 
that they ever saw, Lebanon Valley 
smothered Albright on Saturday by the 
score of 10-7. The day was marred 
ty inclement weather and cut the 
crowd down to about 1000. Intense 
spirit was ripe. Albright brought 
several hundred rooters in special 
cars.. One of the features of the 
game was the cheering of both 
schools. Lebanon Valley outcheered 
the Albright contingent at all stages 
of the game. 

Priofto the game the L. V. boys, 
headed by the Washington Cornet 
Band, paraded over the principal 
thoroughfares of town and gave yells. 
Going back to the campus the "preps" 
and freshmen hauled v the players to 
the field to the tune of a spirited 
Narch by the band . The entire 
student body followed. When the 
bunch arrived on the field Albright 
w as already there. Lebanon Valley 
"nmediately started to sing the Alma 



Mater which rang "clear and strong 
across the field, drowning out the 
Albright songs. When Albright had 
the ball on our one-yard line the in- 
cessant cheers spurred the boys to 
hold the Red and White aggregation 
for downs. The cheering was kept 
up with even more fervor than ever 
after Albright had scored a touch- 
down and it looked as though the 
boys were battling for a forlorn hope. 
After the game several of the fellows 
hastened in to the school and began 
tolling the college bell. For over an 
hour it was kept up. 

Then the underclassme i began 
gathering wood and boxes for a bon- 
fire. By ten o'clock a pile of lumber 
as high as a house was built up. At 
eleven a match was applied and at the 
same time the college bell was again 
tolled. The bell was rung until the 
fire died down in the early hours of 
the morning. A figure of Albright 
was burned in effigy in the center of 
the campus. 

THE GAME 

The first quarter opened with Leba- 
non Valley receiving the ball. Larew 
got it and ran ten yards. We were 
soon forced to kick. By steady 
gains Lebanon Valley advanced 
the ball to the twenty yard line. 
Here it was lost on an attempt- 
ed forward pass. The entire quarter 
was fought nip and tuck throughout. 

Time was called with the ball in 
Albright's possession. 

The second quarter was practically 
a repetition of the first. In this 
quarter Lebanon Valley held Albright 
for downs on the one-yard line. 
Albright made a touchdown but went 
out of bounds. The referee gave the 
ball to Lebanon Valley. Dearolf 
kicked for 70 yards. 

Albright received the ball from the 
kick-off in the third quarter. For a 
(Continued on pag« 2) 



Faculty Recital 

A most charming recital was given 
in the College Chapel, on Thursday 
evening by Miss Gertrude Katherine 
Schmidt, professor of voice culture, 
assisted by Miss May Belle Adams, 
professor of Oratory. Miss Schmidt 
posesses a voice of unusual power 
and sweetness and the entire audience 
was greatly delighted with her pro- 
gram. Both the rendition of her solos 
and her charming manner and 
personality won and captivated her 
hearers. 

Miss Adams equalled and exceeded 
her former reputation as a reader 
and delighted her audience with her 
interpretation of "Count Gismond," 
as well as her other numbers. Both 
Miss Schmidt and Miss Adams were 
vigorously applauded and encored. 
The Program : 

Wie Melodien zieht es mir, Brahms, 
Botschaft, Brahms, Vergebliches 
Standchen, Brahms, "Dich ^theure 
Halle", Tannhauser, Wagner, Count 
Gismond, Robert Browning, Miss 
Adams; Hark! Hark the Lark, 
Schubert, Chantons les Amoure de 
Jean Jeune Fillette, Deux Chantons, 
de XVIII Ciecle, Three Indian Love 
Lyrics, Amy Woodforde-Finden, 
Kashmiri Song, Less than the Dust, 
Till I. Wake, Mr. McLeire's Con- 
valescence, J. J. Bell, Miss Adams; 
You and I Liza Lehman, Dearest, 
Sidney Homer; April Rain, R. H. 
Woodman. 



Dr. Lehman has been confined to his 
home during the week with an attack 
of erysipelas. Many students and 
friends have called on him and in one 
instance an entire class visited him 
in a body. 

Leroy Holler, of Hummehtown, 
a former Lebanon Valley foot ball 
player, was an interested spectator 
at the game. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^e&us 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKF.RS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 
I. VAX L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J., F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPL.EY 
Assistants 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

Lebanon Valley Trims 

Rivals of Old, 10-7 

Continued from page 1 

time the playing was the same as in 
the first two periods. Lebanon Valley 
punted on a fourth down and Albright 
got the ball near the goal. Here a 
forward pass by Benfer gave the first 
score of the game. 

Benfer kicked the goal. Lebanon 
Valley received the kick-off and 
carried the ball to the 40-yard line. 
Dayhoff tried for a goal from place- 
ment but the kick fell a trifle short. 
The quarter ended with the ball in 
Lebanon Valley's possession on their 
20 yard Ikie. Score Albright, 7, 
Lebanon Valley, 0. 

The fourth quarter opened with 
Lebanon Valley as the aggressors. 
Dayhoff kicked a pretty goal from 
placement within a few minutes after 
play was started. Albright received 
the kick-off but soon lost the ball on 
downs. Lebanon Valley then carried 
the ball rapidly down the field until 
within a few yards of the goal. Here 
a forward pass on an end run forma- 
tion gave us the touchdown that won. 



Contributions for Athletics for L. V. C. 

Believing that successful athletics helps greatly to advertise 
the college, and to develop a wholesome college atmosphere in Ihe 
student body, and knowing that all the alumni and many friends 
are interested in the onward march of the school, we request that 
contributions be made to this fund by all who will do so. Any 
amount, however small, will be greatly appreciated. Send all 
monies to Rev. W. H. Weaver, college treasurer. 

G. D. GOSSARD, Pres. 



Dayhoff kicked the goal. Snavely 
received Larew's pretty pass behind 
the goal. 

For Lebanon Valley every last man 
starred. Strickler, Pell, Dayhoff and 
Larew in the backfield put up a great 
game. Snavely and Mackett at tackle 
played classy football. Statton, 
Mowery, Gonder at guard starred. 
Charlton at centre put up first class 
ball. The ends Light, Kirkpatrick 
and Dearolf played some great game. 
Dearolfs punting was one of the 
features. For Albright, Pownall and 
Benfer put up the best game. In the 
last quarter Potei^'er lost control of 
himself and started a slight frncas;, 
which is greatly deplored by both 
sides. The line up. : \ 

ALBRIGHT LEBANON VALLEY 
Young left end Dearolf 

Mull left tackle Mackett 

Shambaugh left guard DeHuff 
Yost centre Charlton 

Brillant right guard Statton 
Tryon right tackle Snavely 

Hartzler right end E. Light 
Pownall quarterback Larew 
A. Light left halfback Strickler 
Poteigr right halfback Pell 
Benfer fullback Dayhoft' 

Substitutions — Baker for Mull, 
Collins for Brillant, Mowery for 
DeHuff, Gunder for Mowery, Kirk- 
patrick for E. Light. Touchdowns— 
A. Light, Snavely. Goals from field 
—Dayhoff, Referee— Harris, Bucknell. 
Head linesman — Barnhart, Lebanon 
Vallev. Linesmen — Dunlap, Al- 
bright, and Carries, Lebanon VaJiey. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C, A. meeting on Sun- 
day afternoon was conducted by Miss 
Florence Mentz. The leader chose 
as her subject "Our Idols", basing 
her remarks upon Exodus 20. She 
emphasized the idol of money, 



fashion, self and fame and showed 
that all these w^rc as nothing com- 
pared to the true God, Above ali 
if we give God our greatest love, 
there will be no place in our hearts 
for idols. 

The attendance was good, but we 
should like to see every one of the 
girls in these short, interesting and 
helpful meetings each Sunday. 



Albright's Hopes Buried 

In chapel on Monday morning an 
amazing sight met the eyes of those 
who attended. On the rostum was 
a casket containing a figure of Al- 
bright in effigy. After chapel the 
"remains" were viewed to the tune 
of a funeral dirge. Many "tears" 
were shed for Albright's Lost Hopes. 

A most spirited meeting followe 
It was found that money was needed 
to pay the asistant coach and to buy 
sweaters for the football men. L. B. 
Harnish, '14 took charge ?nd after 
starting the object, a great ovation 
was given in approtal of the plan. 
Kichie '13 and Ressler, M3 took charge 
of the students and made a minute ca~ 
vassofthem, "Tom" Lyter '15 a 
Al. Weaver, '15 acted as secretaries 
and took down the names of 'he 
subscribers. 

Five, three, two, and one doll 
amounts, to the extent of 285 dollars, 
were subscribed payable on or before 
Wednesday, November, twentieth. 
Never before in the history of the 
school was such a spirited meeting 
held. 

Cheers and songs were indulged iu 
by the student body. It waa 
announced that the faculty had 
pledged a number of scholarships, for 
which they were given round after 
round of cheers. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

PHILOKOSMIAN 

Oration, P. F. Roberts; Christian 
Science Since Mra. Eddy, John 
Mowery; Debate: That, the Honor 
System of Adopted at L. V. C. Would 
prove a Benefit to the Student. 
Affirmative, Robert Hartz, E. K. 
Boughter. Negative, Wm. C. Carl. 

E. Zimmerman ; Piano Solo, Lester 
Snyder; American Chivalry, John 
Leininger; Living Thoughts, Editor. 
CLION1AN 

Piano solo, Ruth E. Engle; The 
Gobbling of Turkey, Florence 
Clippinger; Freshman Impression, 
Esther Moyer; Sketch, Catherine 
Bachman, Josepine Urich; Piano 
Duet, Mary Spayd, Helen Brightbill ; 
Origin of Hallowe'en, Hope Renn ; 
Olive Branch, Editor ; Piano solo, Mrs. 
Grimm. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current History, George Hallman ; 
Essay , E. M. Landis; Quartette, H. 
S, Bender, D.'_E. Young, Clyde Eby, 
T. B. Lyter; Parlimentary Drill, 
Leaders, J. B. Lyter and P. B. 
Gibble: Chorus, Society; Sketch, C. 
H. Arndt, C. E. Mutch; Extempore. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting Sunday was led by Mr. 
Wert, '13. He took for his lesson 
part of the 19th'and part of the 144th 
Psalms, confining his remarks to the 
passage, "Behold what is man that 
thou art mindful of him, or the son of 
man that thou visitest him?" 

The meeting was a very interesting 
one. A number of short, voluntary 
talks were made, and appropriate 
songs sung. 

From this time forward it is our 
intention to post the lesson and the 
name of the leader on the Y. M. C. 
A. bulletin-board in the library during 
each week. This will give each one 
an opportunity to look up any re- 
ference he may wish. 

Come out, fellows; make yourself a 
part of the Y. M. C. A. and it a part 
°f you. College Spirit is not at its 
best unless the Christian Associations 
share in the advancing enthusiasm. 



Gridironettes 

"Pop" Kelchner says that Albright 
did not Jack spirit. Verj true they 
had a bartender on the team. 

Say what is Ben-fer anyhow? 

Instead of a touchdown Snavley had 
a drop down. As soon as that for- 
ward pass touched his fingers, Carl 
calmly surveyed the field and finding 
that he and the goal posts were in 
direct alignment, "Rah Rah" dropped 
forward. Thus endeth the game. 

Dayhoff's shoes were not pointed 
but he was appointed to gain four 
points for us, and he made good. 

Kelchner's Albright "aggregation" 
was somewhat peeved in the evening. 
They needed something stronger 
than "Pop" to cheer them up. 

After "Pollys" end runs, some of 
the Albright team felt somewhat 
"Strick"(en). 

Statton is an experience! hand at 
holding. He proved his worth Satur- 
day by his known ability at said art. 

We cannot say too much for the 
work of "Larry" Larew, our plucky 
captain. He guided the team to 
victory with his good judgement and 
aided it, when he carried the ball 
himself. The victory was, in a large 
degree due to his skill in forward 
passing, and the forward pass which 
won the game came at the most 



WHEN THINKING OF THAT 
GIRL BACK HOME GO TO 



"USSY'S" AND EAT 
RUSS BROS. VELVET 
ICE CREAM 

IT IS JUST ABOUT AS SWEET 
AS SHE IS AND NEVER, 
NEVER FICKLE 

A, S, Miller W. Main St, 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



Root! Root! Root! I WINDSOR HOTEL 



Get your Megaphones, 
Arm-Bands, Pennants, 
Canes and Horns, be- 
fore the Game at the 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



Miss Gladys Bowman, of Koyersford 
was the guest of "Abie" Dearolf. on 
Saturday. 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST- 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catatooue. T R O Y , N - Y« 



COLL EG E NEWS 



opportune .moment and was beauti- 
fully executed; for which we thank 
him and all L. V. supporters every- 
where thank him. 

Some game, boys ! Some game. 
HOW OLD IS ANN? 

If it takes three officials five 
minutes to relieve Carl of the pigskin 
after his touchdown, how many 
minutes will it take both teams and 
fifty spectators to lead Mackett from 
his debate with Benfer? 

What's the matter with Irish? 
"Kirk" didn't wait until Patrick's 
day to shine. 

We believe the Scrubs could have 
cleaned up. 

DeHuff is small but mighty. 

Gonder wished to continue his good 
work. Patience old boy you'll have 
another chance at 'em later. 

Chariton held down his keystone 
job with lots of spirit and ability. 




W. H. Kindt, '90, of Pen Argyl 
was a visitor at the school, on Friday. 

Victor Weidler, '10, visited his 
brother, Russel, on Saturday, and 
took in the game. 

Charles Plurnmer, '10, saw the 
game on Saturday. 

Oliver Butterwick, '12, Assistant 
Principal of the Hershey High school, 
was] an interested spectator at the 
foot ball game. 

Claire Harnish, '12, of Mechanics- 
burg, spent the week end at the 
college. 

Rev. Mathias, '05, of Bridge Port, 
Conn., visited here Friday and 
Saturday. 

Miss Eliazbeth Lau, '12, Secretary 
of the Pennsylvania Branch of Y. 
P. S. C. E., attended the Con- 
ference at Frederick, Md. 

Rev Grant L. Schaeffer, '93, is 
pastor of the Congregational church, 
of Lebanon, N. H. 




Items of Interest 




J. Austin Larew is visiting his 
brother, John. 



4 'Kid" Matthews, of Hershey 
headed a delegation from that place 
to the game, on Saturday. 
' W. F. Evans and son Arthur, of 
Lykens were the guests of David 
Evans on Saturday. 

Earle Lehr, of Lykens saw the 
game, on Saturday. 

Mr. Quigley, of Red Lion visited 
his daughter, Ruth last week. 

Miss Sarah Weitzel and Miss Mary 
Shaub, of Harrisburg were the guests 
of Van B. Dayhoff at the game. 

Barton and Merrill Ressler, of 
Shamjkin are spending several days 
with their brother, Ivan. 

Everybody was certain that Lebanon 
Valley would win after Prof. Shenk 
had found his four leafed clover on 
the Athletic field. Let nobody say 
in the future, that to find a four 
leafed clover is not lucky. 



oCebanon l/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in C/iemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hal! are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. <D. Sossarctj President 
Jtnnville, SPa. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 

I T. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Etigle Hotel Annville, F*n 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FPESH 

W, Main St, Annville, Pa, 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



BONEBRHKE THEOLOGICAL *m mhi boys eat 



DAYTON, O, 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 
L The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy'" o 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST A 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

KEGOPIlliEPHTIOH AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and 6 of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATION and 
NOTIFICATIONS, yet this Agency is almost 
entirely a RECOMMENDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
lias been devoted to selecting and recommending 
a pplicants for positions we have been asked to 
till. 

We give no time to heresay or newspaper 
vacancies. 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up* 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COIiliEGE NEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY C< 
Volume IV. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, October 29, 1912 jMo. 40 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Reception in Honor 

of New President 

A MOST DELIGHTFUL AFFAIR 



On Friday evening, October twenty 
fifth, in the parlors of the Ladies 
Hall, between the hours of eight and 
t;n, the faculty received ana enter- 
tained the many friends and stu- 
dents of the school in honor of Dr. 
and Mrs. Gossard and Miss Minnie 
Gossard. 

The parlors had been decorated early 
in the afternoon with autumn leaves* 
and autumn flowers. The beauty of 
these decorations added greatly to the 
charm of the occasion. 

The guests were received at the 
door by a reception committee, after 
which an opportunity was given them 
to meet and become acquainted with 
Dr. and Mrs. Gossard and other mem- 
bers of the faculty. Delicious re- 
freshments were served in the Dining 
Hall of the Dormitory, which was 
also beautifully decorated. 

This reception was one of the most 
delightful affairs given at the college 
for many years. Very many of our 
honored town citizens were present 
as well as friends from neighboring 
places. The occasion afforded a very 
pleasant opportunity for making our 
own town people better friends with 
the college folk, thus creating again 
°ur much desired "co-operation." 
The students and friends feel in- 
debted to the faculty, who planned 
and arranged the event, for the 
delightful evennig. The Juniors 
assisted the faculty in decorating and 
the Senior in receiving and enter- 
taining. 

Besides the town people present, 
some who attended are: Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Millard, Rev. and Mrs. B. 



F. Daugherty, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
Bowman, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hunsicker, Miss Maggie Strickler, 
Mr. Fred Light, Mrs. Stine, Miss 
Nellie Seltzer, Miss Edna Kilmer, 
Mr. McCurdy, C. W. Plummer. 

Class of 1911 

Albert Brunner, teacher, York 
High School, York, Pa. 

O. T. Ehrhart, minister, Leba- 
non, Pa. 

W. 0. Ellis, Perdue University, 
Ind. 

P. Holdemn, minister, Valley 
Veiw, Pa. 

Artus Kauffman, Dallastown, Pa. 

Fred Frost, teacher, Lebanon, Pa. 

•Francis Kennedy, Y. M. C. A., 
Ducktown, Tenn. 

Paul Koontz, Bonebrake Theological 
Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. 

John Lehman, University of 
Pennsylvania, Pa. 

Edward Marshall, University of 
Pennsylvania, Pa. 

Roger Saylor, teacher, Ann- 
ville, Pa. 

W. C. Schoop, teacher, Walls, Pa. 

Earle Spessard, teacher, Aurora, 
111. 

Lester Spessard, Grant Pass, 
Oregon. 

Samuel Zeigler, Bonebrake Theo- 
logical Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. 

Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Joint 
Session 

"Place of the Christian Associa- 
tions in College Life." Leader, 
Florence Clippinger; Its immediate 
influence, Lester A. Rhodes; Quar- 
tette, Helen Brightbill, Edith Leh- 
man, Mary Spayd, Lottie Spessard; Its 
influence in after life, G. A. Richie: 
Personal Benefits, General Discussion. 



President* Southwick Coming! 

Another great treat is in store for 
us, in the coming of Dr. Lawrence 
Southwick, President of Emerson 
College of Oratory, on November 4. 

The Clionian Literary Society, 
through Miss Adams has again been 
able to procure Dr. Southwick at a 
possible price. The society has asked 
him to read "Othello" which is one 
of his strongest numbers. Those of us 
who heard Dr. Southwick last year 
will vouch for his wonderful ability 
and power as a reader. He is a. 
master student of Shakespeare and a 
reader of national reputation. 

Since the society has arranged this 
recital not for their own material 
benefit but for the benefit of the stu- 
dents and the public— we hope that 
everyone will patronize and help the 
Clios meet the expenses of bringing 
Dr. Southwick here. 

Deutcher Verein 

The "Deutcher Verein" held its 
first regular meeting on^last Wednes- 
day evening. A business meeting was 
first held in which a constitution was 
adopted, after which a very pleasing 
program was rendered. The remain- 
der of the evening was spent in play- 
ign German gam^s. 

The program rendered was as. 
follows : 

Vereingesang, Die Lorelei ; Die 
Lebensbeschreiburg Lessings, Herr C. 
Ulrich; Deklamation, Goethes Der 
Erlkonig, Fraulein Brightbill; Die 
geschichite des Nibelungenliedes, 
Fraulein Meyer; Eine Geschichite, 
Herr Schmidt; Vereinsgesang, Die 
Wachtan Rhein. 

The following crowd walked to 
Gretna, Monday : Misses Brightbill, 
Erwin, Bachman, Mentz, Ruth Engle 
and Larene Engle, Messrs. Statt on, 
Evans, Stickell, Dayhoff, Larew and 
Kirkpatrick. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College JSLems 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. P. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 

Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

fc0 all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The reading room of our Library 
contains this placard, "Think." 
How many of us, when we see that 
sign, stop to think about thinking. 
Studying and thinking are intimately 
related. All studying represents 
thinking, but thinking may not repre- 
sent studying. Thinking is the appli- 
cation of the mind to a problem, a 
condition. It stands for accuracy, 
thoroughness, searching and investiga- 
tion. Thinking h work and it is 
hard work, if it be hard thinking. 
This, as college men and women, is 
our work. Some knowledge can be 
obtained without thinking but how 
does that knowledge compare with the 
developed power of thinking. In 
the last analysis thinking stands back 
of all true knowledge. 

Some believe that college people, 
as a class, are becoming less eager to 
carry on the labor of thinking. A 
distinguished teacher once said: "I 
believe that the thinking power of 
Students and their unwillingness to 
undertake hard tasks have distinctly 



Contributions for Athletics for L. V. C. 



Believing that successful athletics helps greatly to advertise 
the college, and to develop a wholesome college atmosphere in the 
student body, and knowing that all the alumni and many friends 
are interested in the onward march of the school, we request that 
contributions be made to this fund by all who will do so. Any 
amount, however small, will be greatly appreciated. Send all 
monies to Re^. W. H. Weaver, college treasurer. 

G. D. GOSSARD, Pres. 



lessened in the last ten years. The 
food the student now gets is poured 
into him predigested. He no longer 
tears off, chews, masticates, and de- 
glutinates his food,— he simply bolts 
it. This is what the average student 
prefers." Do we belong to this 
class? 

A few causes of this condition exist 
in most colleges. One fault may go 
back to the preparatory school. A 
stiff college entrance examination 
causes in many cases a cramming of 
fact in these schools. Often athletic 
concerns tend to draw away the inter- 
est from intellectual concerns. Per- 
haps the elective system, if two muoh 
freedom of selection is allowed, 
results in neglect of intellectual 
severities. These things help to bury 
the power of thinking, but how about 
the student himself? What part does 
he play? If the student will not 
study, he is to be excluded from the 
place of study. The college demands 
that college men and women should 
"make good". It is of greatest 
concern to us to attend to the great 
business of thinking. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting Sunday was up to the 
usual standard; a very devotional 
spirit was manifest in every one pre- 
sent. The attendance was good. 

The meeting was conducted by one 
of our new members, Mr. Clayton H. 
Zuse, '16. He took for his theme, 
"Inexcusable Man," basing his re- 
marks on Rom. 2-1 "Therefore thou 
art inexcusable, O man, whosoever 
thou judgest another, thou condemnest 
thyself; for thou that judgest doest 
the same things" and on Michal 
6-8. "He that shewed thee, O man, 
what is good; and what doth the Lord 



require of thee, but to do justly, and 
to love mercy, and to walk humbly 
with thy God?" 

The remarks made by the leader 
were very creditable to him and help- 
ful to his hearers. 

After the meeting was over every 
one present went in a body to call on 
Doctor Lehman. They found him in 
his usual happy mood, well nigh re- 
covered from his present illness. He 
expects to resume his duties in college 
about the middle of this week. 




Alumni 



I. Moyer Hershey, '03 has been 
appointed Secretary of the Hershey Y. 
M. C. A. 

C, W. Plummer, '10 is employed a 
Hershey. 

Miss Edith Freed, '10, Berwyn, 
Pa., spent the week end at the hom e 
of Rev. Z. A. Weidler, Coates- 
ville, Pa. 

Miss Edna Klimer, '12, Reading, 
Pa, is substituting for Prof. Lehman, 
who is ill. 

Miss Nell Seltzer, '12, Parksburg 
Pa., attended the reception, on Frida 
night. 

Dr. Ralph Engle of the Bellevue 
Hospital, New York, visited school last 
week. 

Prohibition League 

The Prohibition League was re- 
organized, Monday. The following 
officers were elected, President, G. A. 
Richie; Vice President, H. E. 
Snavely; Secretary, C. E. Krenz; 
Treasurer, Mark Wert. George 
Williams was appointed to arrange 
for a preliminary contest. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 



Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following address: 



Name 
Street 
City ■ 



State 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLI0N1AN 
Piano solo, Ruth E. Engle; The 
Gobbling of Turkey, Florence Clipp- 
inger; Freshman Impressions, Esther 
Moyer; Sketch, Catherine Bachman, 
Josephine Urich; Piano Duet, Mary 
Spayd, Helen Brightbill; Origin of 
Hallowe'en, Hope Renn; Olive 
Branch, Editor; Piano solo Mrs. 
Grimm. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
The Dimentia of Speed, John 0. 
Jones; At Other Colleges, Howard L. 
Olewiler; Debate: Resolved — That, 
Taft Has Carried Out His Platform 
as Outlined in 1908. Aflirmative. C. 
E. Brenneman, Russel Weidler, Nega- 
tive, 0. E. Krenz, Paul Bowman 
Short story contest, Harold Risser, 
Allen B. Engle, Harold Wrightstone ; 
Piano solo, John 0. Jones; The 
Drug Fakers -and the Cure, Clayton 
Zuse. 

KALOZETEAN 
Paper, Willis Mac Nelly; Political 
Situation, H. E. Snavely; Chorus, 
Society; Debate: Resolved — That, 
the Present Political Campaign is One 
of Personalities Rather Than of Real 
Issues. Affirmative, D. E. Young, 
P. L. Strickler. H. H. Charlton, 
Clyde Eby; Lecture, B. G. Light; 
Chorus, society ; Quotations from 
Mark Twain, Society; Examiner, 
Editor 



jCeban on 7/ alley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 



Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 
&ev. S. <D. Sossardj President 



T 



I 



DAYTON, O, 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 
1 The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

rrominence given to "Religious pedagogy" o 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 

* Expensed Low-no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 
For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



WHEN THINKING OF THAT 
GIRL BACK HOME GO TO 



"USSY'S" AND EAT 
RUSS BROS. VELVET 
ICE CREAM 

IT IS JUST ABOUT AS SWEET 
AS SHE IS AND NEVER, 
NEVER FICKLE 

A, S, Miller W. Main St, 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Elmer Kirkpatrick, '16, spent Sun- 
day at his home in Harrisburg. 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% s SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Cataloaue. TROY, N«Y« 



COLL EG E NEWS 




RTMfTNG 



When You Want It 
Reasonable Prices 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Journal ? ^fishing Company 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



f Items of Interest 



The monthly joint session of the Y. 
W. and Y. M. C. A's will be held 
Sunday, Nov. 3 at 1 o'clock. 

The "hikers" took their first hike, 
Saturday, to the Water Works. 

Josephine Mathias, '16, spent the 
week end at her home in High Spire. 

Leroy Macket spent the week end 
with Van DayhofF at his home in 
Steelton. 

Pau] Strickler, '14, w.as the guest 
of John Lyter, at Harrisburg, on Sun- 
day. 

Miss Josephine Urich, '14, spent 
Sunday in Harrisburg with Miss Mary 
Irvin. 

John Lerew, '15, stopped at his 
home in Dillsburg, over Sunday, on 
his return from Carlisle. 



and drew from it several great 
lessons. In closing two important 
questions were asked, "Does My 
Life Include Any Self-sacrifice" and 
"Is My Life Such that God Can Bless 
it Greatly." 

Hallowe'en Novelties 

False Faces, Noise Makers, Con- 
fetti, Napkins, and 
Favors 

HARNISH & SMITH'S 
Book Store 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 



At KINPORTS' 

Students' Discount 



Annville, Pa. 

Packard & Padcliffc Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING' 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 



LIVERY 

Kirst Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCCv 
LATES. ALWAYS FPESH 

W, Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

: Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



Washington Hotel RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 



HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 



A. S. MILLER 



W. MAIN ST. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday afternoon 
was conducted by Miss Edna Yarkers, 
who took as her subject "Lessons 
From the Love Story of Ruth." 
The leader retold the story of Ruth 
in a very simple and beautiful way 



W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty, 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 



(I SECORllHENDflTIOH AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and G of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATIONS and! 
NOTIFICATIONS, vet this Agenev is almost 
entirely allKt'OMMENDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time to hea-say or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up' 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R, L, MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLiliEGE rlEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Volume \\jt . Annville, Pa., Tuesday^^SHI^^^^^^^P - No. 1 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 8, IKTV 



Lebanon Valley Triumphs 
Over Indian Second 
Team, 23 to 

In an interesting game on Satur- 
day, Lebanon Valley defeated the Car- 
lisle Indian second team by the score 
of 23-0. Lebanon Valley showed 
more life in this game than it has in 
any game this season. The boys 
with few exceptions were in excellent 
condition for the fray. The playing 
of Lebanon Valley was superior to 
that of th<> Indiana at all stages of 
the game. 

Only one fault is to be found with 
the playing. The line did not hold as 
well as usual and the Indians fre- 
quently plunged through for long 
gains. However they did not become 
dangerous duiing the entire game. 
The fast white and blue backfield 
offset this weakness of the line. 

For Lebanon Valley, Dayhoff, Larew 
and Pell starred. Dayhoff had another 
field goal to add to his credit, and 
kicked two goals. Larew scored two 
of the three touchdowns. Pell re- 
peatedly made long gains through the 
Indian line. Dearolf played an ex- 
cellent game at end. His defensive 
work was spectacular. Strickler 
was not used much on account of hav- 
ln g just recovered fiom a severe in- 
jury. He got away for a run of 
forty yards around the end in the 
second quarter. In the third quarter 
Mackert carried the ball over for a 
touchdown. Just as he was about to 
be tackled he made a sensational dive 
from the five yard line and both he 
and the tackier landed in a heap 
across the goal line. This was one of 
the most spectacular plays ever seen 
°h the home grounds. 

For the Indians Broker was the sole 
8 tar, Repeatedly on fake kicks and 



formations he tore around the ends for 
long gains. 

The forward pass was not used 
much. The Indians made three at- 
tempts but two failed, and the third 
was a short pass on which they lost 
several yards. One pass fell short 
and the other was intercepted by Pell. 
Lebanon Valley only tried one forward 
pass which was broken up by the 
Indians. The Indians resorted to 
trick plays while Lebanon Valley used 
nothing but straight football 
THE GAME 

Lebanon Valley won the toss and 
received. Von Beregly received the 
kick and advanced several yards. By 
repeated gains the white and blue 
carried the ball to the three yard line 
when Captain Larew went over for the 
first touchdown. There was no more 
scoring in this quarter, which ended 
with the ball in the Indian's posses- 
sion. 

In the second quarter the Indians 
soon lost the ball on downs. Dayhoff 
kicked a field goal from the thirty 
yard line. In 'he last quarter 
Indians received the kickoff but soon 
lost the ball. Lebanon Valley then 
went to work and never stopped until 
another touchdown was added to our 
credit. The half ended with the ball 
in our possession. 

In the third quarter Mackert carried 
Continued on page 2 



Mathematical Round Table 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Round Table was held Wednesday 
evening, October 30th, when three 
very interesting papers were read. 
The subject oi the first paper by Mr. 
Statton was "Some Deficiencies ira 
the Teaching of Mathematics." The 
greatest fault is inaccuracy, careless 
mistakes in the work, which make 
the final result wrong and the correct 
result is what we work for. The 
second paper by Miss Yarkers or* 
"Arithmetic Notation" contained a 
short history of the leading arithme- 
tical systems such as tne Roman,. 
Greek, Chinese, and a discussion of 
our own system based upon the nine 
Arabic numbers and the cipher. 
Mr. Bowmen gave an interesting 
discussion of the minus sign. He> 
showed in a number of ways how the 
minus sign changed the entire value 
of an equation and then gave the. 
proofs for it. 

The time for the next meeting ha& 
been changed to Nov. 25th on account 
of the Thanksgiving recess. 



Clionian Anniversary 

The date of the Anniversary has 
been changed from Thanksgiving until 
the Friday evening preceding. This 
change is due to the Thanksgiving 
recess. 



Contributions for Athletics for L. V. C. 



Believing that successful athletics helps greatly to advertise 
the college, and to develop a wholesome college atmosphere in the 
student body, and knowing that all the alumni and many friends 
are interested in the onward march of the school, we request that 
contributions be made to this fund by all who will do so. Any 
amount, however small, will be greatly appreciated. Send all 
monies to Rev. W. H. Weaver, college treasurer. 

G. D. GOSSARD, Pres. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKF.RS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. P. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 

Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to ■ . all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

It seems from the general tenor of 
observation and the attitude taken by 
some students that the real signi- 
ficance of a college course has escaped 
very many of the American students. 
When asked the question, what is the 
purpose of a college course, the 
very familiar answer i3 given: lo pre- 
pare one for life's work. This is 
true if the present time is meant as 
well as the future. Students too often 
get the idea that they are going to 
<do wonders when they get into active 
lite sometime in the future. They 
don't realize that at the same time 
they are learning to think, that their 
thoughts must be put into practice in 
order to be affective and count for 
something. The true 'deal of the 
college course is not to seclude one 
from the practical world, but to lead 
one s\ gtematically into it. The stu- 
dent who pays attention only to study 
and does not put the creative force 
acquired into practice, will not be able 
to do so when engaged in active life. 
If the student spends four years of his 



life exclusively to get theories, is it 
not true that he will have to SDend an 
equal amount of time to learn how to 
apply them? Life is too short and 
the problems are too great to do this. 
Many are the problems which are con- 
i'tonting the American people tjday. 
Great questions are assumming 
greater magnitude in politics, in 
religion and in every phaze of life. 
Thousands of men and women are in 
the colleges of our land training for 
the leadership to help to make the 
existing conditions better. And to 
whom can the world look with better 
hope and expectation than to college 
trained men and women. It is the 
college graduate, who is expected to 
be able to meet problem after problem, 
bringing its solution with him. On 
him in a few short yeais will the 
people place the great responsibility 
of pu^li j trust. To him will the 
people look for tact judgement, and 
management. Is there any reason 
why he should not be practif-al? The 
problem in society is not the idea of 
reform but how to put the idea into 
practice. We no longer fear the 
block or banishment for advocating 
reform. We no longer refuse to let 
people express their thoughts in 
public or put them in practice. Re- 
forms were wrought in various foreign 
countries by the uprising of the stu- 
dents of colleges and universities. In 
like manner many problems are con- 
fronting the American college stu- 
dents. 

One of these problems is the turn, 
traffic. Ihis problem is being solved 
not only through the national party, 
but through the effective woik and or- 
ganization of the Collegiate Prohibi- 
tion Leagues. The purpose of this 
organization is to acquaint college 
men and women more fully with the 
real conditions, and through their woik 
to furnish to the public the knowledge 
of what harm the saloon is doing io 
the American Youth of today. The 
manner in which this knowledge is 
conveyed to the public is through the 
medium of oratory. The method of 
interesting students is in the contests. 
Students may take any phaze of 
prohibition work and discuss it. 
We are glad to say that the repre- 
sentative from Lebanon Valley three 



years ago succeeded in coining th e 
first prize of fifty dollars in the 
Inter-Collegiate oratorical contest. 
This should be encouragement for 
our students to work this year The 
different officers, for our dome 
league were elected last week and we 
fondly hope they will persuad every 
able student to take part in this 
phaze of collgee work, l et every 
student both male and female realize 
that this is a noble work, and by par- 
ticipating in it they will win credit 
both themselves and to their Alma 
Mater. 

L. V. 23--Indians 

(Continued from page 1) 

the ball over the line for our last 
touchdown. ' The Indians received the 
kickoff and advanced to the twenty 
yard line where th9 ball was lost on a 
fumble. The quarter ended with the 
bail in Lebanon Valley's possession. 

The fourth quarter belongs to the 
Indians. It was the only time when the 
boys were really dangerous. Broker 
made long gains on fake kicks for- 
mations. The game ended with the 
ball in the Indians possession on the 
thirty yard line. The line up: 



L. V. INDIANS 

Der.rolf L. E. Plenty 

Mackert L. T. Jackobs 

DeHuff L. G. Gillman 

Charlton C. Pambren 

Station R. G. Dennis 

Von Bereghy R. T. Pratt 

Snavely R. E. Chare 

Larew. Capt. Q D Smith 

Strickhr L. H. B. Giroux 

Pell R H. B. Wollett 



Dayhoff F. B. Capt. Broker 

Referee, Dwyer, Lehigh. Umpire, 
Barnharat, Steelton. Head linesman, 
Buttervvick. i ebanon Valley. Quar- 
ters 15, 12. 15, 12. Touchdowns, 
Larew 2, Mackret. Goals from 
touch down, Dayhoff 2. Field goal,. 
Dayhoff. 

SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

CLIO- FiilLO JOINT SESSION 
Piano duet, Miss Velma Hemdel, 
Miss Rutn Quigley; Autobiograpny. 
William C. Catl; Essay, V. D. Mul- 
hollen; Vocal solo, Lester A. Rodes; 
Heading, Miss Elta Weaver; 
"Leap Year" Edna Yaikers, Florence 
Christeson, Florence Clippinger, 



COLL EG E NEWS 



.Josephine Urich, Josephine Mathias, 
D. L. Reddick, Leray B. Harnish; 
Violin Solo, Philo A. Statton ; Olive 
Branch, Living Thoughts, Editors. 
KALOZETEAN 
Current History, George Halltnan ; 
Essay, E. M. Landis Quartette, H. 
B. Bender, D. E. Young, Clyde Eby, 
T. B. Lyter; Parlimentary Drill 
Leaders, J. B. Lyter, P. B. Gibble; 
Chorus, society; Sketch, C. H. 
Arndt, U. E. Mutch; Extempore. 

"Othello" 

Those, who attended the recital of 
Dr. Henry Lawrence fouthwiek on 
Monday night were delighted and 
overjoyed with his reading of 
•"Othello," while those who took the 
trouble to stay away-missed un- 
doubtedly The best entertainmant to be 
given in the college chapel this year. 

Dr. Southwick, who was secured by 
the Clios through Miss Adams, came 
recommended as one of the best 
Shakespearian readers of tlie Ame- 
rican platform, "a peer of orators," 
and after the recitai no one went away 
disappointed. He is e master student 
and a master interpreter of Shakes- 
peare and his rendition cf ''Othello" 
was powerful. 

The Clios are to be congratulated 
for bringing such an excellent lecturer 
to the college, and the number of 
empty seats in the house on Monday 
night, only reflects disgrace upon 
the community. Let none of the 
■"chronic kickers" again bewail the 
fact that Air ville is not favored with 
'''the good things." We are very 
■sorry that it was necessary to bring 
Dr. Southwick here at a time, when 
many were unavoidably prevented from 
attending and we heartily thank those 
who did patronize the recital. 

Hallowe'en Party 

Thursday evening, Oct. 31, the 
Philokosmian Literary Society enter- 
tained the faculty, students and 
friends of the college at their annual 
Hallowe'en party. 

Everybody was invited to the 
c hapei and from there by a circuitous 
route, taken to the town market- 
house. The building was transformed 
ln to a bit of real out-doors by grpat 
shocks of corn and beautiful autumn 
'eaves. A dim light was thrown 



over everything from the numerous 
jack o' lanterns, each grinning pumpk- 
in head sseming to nod a welcome to 
all. 

'[he evening was begun in a lively 

Hallowe'en Novelties 

False Faces, Noise Makers, Con- 
fetti, Napkins, and 
Favors 

HARNISH & SMITH'S 
Book Store 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa 

D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets' 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 

"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 



LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
I I. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Engle Hotel Annville, F"f» 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

"Flower Brand" Potato 

Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



II REGOmmEPflTION AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and g of our eontraci 
refer respectively Co RECOMMENDATIONS and 
NOTIFICATIONS yet this Agenev is almost 
entirely aRECOMMENDATN in AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 19W6, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
till. 

We give no time to hca say or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up' 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlant a 



COLLEGE NEWS 



fashion by a clog dance. A real for- 
tune teller and boys dressed in fan- 
tastic costumes added to the gayety. 
Games were played, songs sung and a 
real Hallowe'en spirit ruled over all. 

Delicious pumpkin pies, doughnuts, 
apples and cider were served. 

At 10 o'clock the happy guests re- 
gretfully said good-night, sorry that 
an evening of such great pleasure, had 
to end so soon. 



Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Joint 
Session 

This joint session was under the 
chargo of the devotional committees, 
who choose for the general topic, 
"The Place of the Christian Associa- 
tions in College Life." Miss 
Clippinger, the leader, described the 
main purpose of tne Christian Associa- 
tion, which is "So to Exhalt Christ 
in Our Own Hearts and Lives That 
he May Draw all Men Unto Him." 
The Christian Association is the link 
between the church and the world. 
Mr. Rhodes discussed its immediate 
influences. In a certain way it takes 
the place of church services. When 
we come here, at once we can take an 
active part and receive its benefits. 
The mid week and the Sunday meet- 
ings give one an incentive to live 
upon a higher moral plane. Mr. 
Richie spoke on "Its influences in 
after life." Through training in the 
Associations the qualities, which we 
need in after life, are developed, 
such as self-control and above all 
the righteousness of Christ. 

Misses Spessard md Brightbill 
furnished th* special music. 




Alumni 



Max F. Lehman, '07 spent Satur 
day and Sunday with his parents. 

Claire Hamish, '12, spent Saturday 
and Sunday in Annville, visiting 
friends. 

Mr. W. V. Spessard, '09, of 
Hagerstown, Md, will entertain an L. 
V. Alumni house party next week, in- 
cluding A. D. Flook, '09, V. 0. 
Weidler, '10, M. F. Lehman, '07, and 
ther friends of the school. 

L. L. Spessard, '11, of Grant's 
Pass, Ore , has been spending the past 



weeks in the Cat Range Mountains, 
hunting deer, bear, and mountain lion 
for the winter's supply. 

Norman L. Linebaugh, '08 was 
here, Friday, to arrange for post-gra- 
duate work. 

Edward Marshall, '11 a'student at 
U. of P., returned to Annville to cast 
his first ballot for the President. 

Rev. O. T. Erhart, '11, was a 
spectator at the foot ball game on 
Saturday. 

"Ollie' Butterwick, '12 passed 
through town in an auto, last week. 



iTEMS OF INTEREST 

The net proceeds from Miss 
Schmidt's recital with a contribution 
from the music students was used to 
purchase a set of five volumes of 
Grove's Musical Dictionary. The 
price paid was twenty-five dollars. 

Mrs, Sheldon spent Saturday and 
Sunday in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Ellis, of Jonestown, visited his 
daughter, Monday. 

jCebanon l/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

W rite for catalogue 
ttev. S. 0. Sossarct, iPresidcnt 



T 



L 



DAYTON, O. 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy"' o 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catuli 
Address the President, 



;ue-Bulletin 



WHEN THINKING OF THAT 
GIRL BACK HOME GO TO 



"USSY'S" AND EAT 
RUSS BROS. VELVET 
ICE CREAM 



IT IS JUST ABOUT AS SWEET 
AS SHE IS AND NEVER, 
NEVER FICKLE 



A. S. Miller 



W. Main St.. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the- 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, M^r. 



Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

%, SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y* 



COLLEGE JSl*'S 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume (V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, fiovembetr 19, 1912 fio. 3 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Albright 20 

Lebanon Valley 7 

In the second game of the season 
with Albright, the Blue and White 
went down to defeat heroically. 
The fact that several of L. V. players 
were not in a condition to play 
weakened their chance from the be- 
ginning. During the first half Day- 
hoff, Dearolf and Snavely were re- 
moved on account of injuries. Both 
teams played well. Benfer, starred 
for Albright and Potteiger and Light 
made consistent gains. For Lebanon 
Valley the entire back field played 
brilliantly, all carrying the ball for 
gains through the [line and around the 
ends. Pell and Strickler deserve 
prais« for their work. The Lebanon 
Valleys players are to be compliment- 
ed upon their noble work because of 
the many odds against them. 

The Blue and White won the first 
game with Albright 10-7. Lineup: 



L. V. ALBRIGHT 

Dearolf L. E. Young 

Mackert L. T. Evans 

Mickey L. G. Shambaugh 

Charlton C. Yost 

Gonders R. G. Brillhart 

Vonbergly R. T. Tryon 

Snavely R. ti. Sheffly 

Larew Q. B. Pownall 

Strickler L. H B. Light 

Pell R. H. B. Potteiger 

Dayhoff F. B. Benfer 



Touchdowns — Benfer 2, Dearolf, 
Potteiger. Goals from touchdowns 
Benfer 2; Dearolf. Referee -Smith, 
Bucknell; Umpire— Cravert, Dickin- 
son; Head linesman, Miller. Time 
of quarters, 15 minutes. 



The last game of the season will be 
Played, Saturdaj, with Millersville 
State Normal. Come all and help the 
team win, for win they will. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, Nov. 20, 7:30 p. m.— 
Fellowship meeting, "Church and 
College" 

Thursday, Nov. 21, 6 p. m.— 
Ministerial meeting, speaker Rev. 
0. T. Ehrhart; 7:45 p. in.— Musicale 
in the new church. 

Friday, Nov. 22, 8 p. m,— Clionian 
Anniversary. 

Saturday, Nov. 23, 3 p. m.— 
Millersville Normal at Annville. 

Sunday, Nov. 24, 1 p. m.— 
Christian Associations. 



The College Girls 

The first number of the Star Course 
was given on Friday evening, before 
a very large audience. A great many 
of the towns-people patronized the 
entertainment as usual, and as usual 
for the first number of the Course 
there was quite a crowd of 
"shiners." The committee was well 
pleased with the large audience, and 
hopes that the good work will con- 
tinue. 

'Iha entertainment, though not of 
the first class, was good for a light 
concert and held the attention 
throughout. It was full of action 
and clever, catchy impersonations, 
the costuming added interest. The 
humor of Mr. Eccles helped to chase 
away the cares and frowns of many. 

The next number of the course 
comes on Dec. 4, when we shall have 
the "Dixie Chorus" which promises 
much. 



Deutscher Verein 

Verein gesang, "Du Bist wie eine 
Blume", Viola Gruber; Quartet, 
{Catherine Bachman, Mary Irvin, 
Messrs. Shepley and Charleton ; Eine 
Gespenstergeschichte, Paul Strickler; 
Klavier solo, Mary Spayd; Dialog, 
Die Herren Lyter; Vereingesang. 



Annville U. B. 

Church Dedicated 

$45,800 Raised During the Day, Pays 
Balance of Church Debt Which 
Was at First $74,000 

All who attended the Dedicatory 
services of the new U. B. church, on 
Sunday were delighted with the build- 
ing, the services and the spirit mani- 
fested. The church was built at a 
cost of $74,000 and was arranged with 
a regular seating capacity cf 1200, 
when the S. S. rooms at the rear of 
the main auditorium are opened. 
The entire church was crowded and 
the attendance at the afternoon and 
evening meetings was estimated at 
1300. 

The first service was held at nine 
o'clock in the Sunday school. Here 
Dr Gossard made a brief but excellent 
address. Special music was rendered 
by the orchestra of fifteen pieces. 
Sunday school was followed by the 
regular preaching services at which 
Dr. Funk, of Dayton, officiated. In 
the afternoon Dr. Lowery preached 
the sermon and the subscription 
lists were con pleted, when $45,000 
had been raised by the members and 
friends of the church under the leader- 
ship of Dr. Funk. In the evening 
Dr.^Funk again preached an excellent 
sermon and with the assistance of 
Rev. Spayd, the pastor, 'and the Board 
of Trustees, the consecratory service 
was held. 

Music was rendered throughout the 
day by the regular U. B. choir, 
assisted by Mrs. Alfred K. Mills and 
Mrs. G. R. Kreider, .fr. 

The entire day was filled with 
delightful experiences and surprises. 
Most of the students were present 
at the meetings and they are urged to 
Continued on page 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fields 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 
Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 



Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

"Boosting our college" should be 
the slogan of every loyal daughter 
and son of Lebanon Valley. The 
principle of telling broadcast all the 
good about our college and of always 
presenting her bright and better as- 
pects can make Her more widely and 
favorably known. One of her sons 
has this spirit and it is purposed to 
show in what ways he has carried it 
out. We refer to Leray B. Harnish, 
'14 of Carlisle, better known among 
us as "Reporter Harnish." He had 
the pictures of the football squad and 
the Girl's Glee Club published in the 
Philadelphia and Harrisburg papers 
this fall. From September 1910 to 
March 1912, Mr. Harnish succeeded 
in having, at advertising rates 
$11,445.20 worth of space, news items 
of L. V. C, published in the leading 
Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Lebanon 
papers. 

Another accomplishment is the 
compulsory Athletic fee. This he 



helped to secure after conferences 
with students, alumni and the college 
trustees, and then finally presenting 
this cause to the Executive Board of 
the College. Mr. Harnish bore the 
entire expenses of printing, postage 
and carfare, incident to the securing 
of the compulsory fee. This has 
helped to make our foot ball season 
successful. 

At present he is Secretary of the 
Executive Board of the L. V. C. 
Athletic Association and in that 
capacity has begun a set of books, in 
which an accurate account of all 
athletic proceeding, will be kept. 

Our effort to give credit to whom it 
is due would be incomplete if we 
failed to mention cur pictorial 
exhibit in the museum of the Educa- 
tional Department in the State Capitol, 
secured largely through the efforts 
of Mr. Harnish. This exhibit 
contains not only pictures of all the 
buildings, Literary societies, Glee 
Clubs, etc., but several catalogues of 
the colleges and the 1912 and 1913 
Bizarres, cheerfully furnished by their 
respective managers. The State 
Department has complimented him 
upon it. 

This ha? been accomplished by one 
loyal son of Lebanon Valley. Others 
have accomplished many things. May 
this principle of elevating and 
proclaiming L. V. C. be carried out 
by each one of us to the very utmost 
of our ability. 



Annville U. B. Church Dedi" 
cated 

(Continued from page i) 

continue in attending. It is the 
church of the school, and is situated 
so near to us at the south-east corner 
of the campus. With the cooperation 
which the church has given to the 
school, it is the most logical place 
for us to go. This is an opportunity 
for us to help bring closer the ties 
between church and college and to 
strengthen that bond of unity by help- 
ing each other. 

Services will be held Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Ihursday evenings of 
this week. On Wednesday evening 
we will have a Fellowship meeting be- 
tween the church and college. Dr. 
Gossard will preach the sermon. 
Every student is urged to be present. 

Mathematical Round Table 



NOV. 25, 1912 
Teaching of Geometry, Professor 
Grimm. ; Originals in Geometry, 
Russel Weidler; Discussion, Does 
Mathematics have More Disciplinary 
Value Than 1 atin or Greek? Leaders, 
Pro , Lottie Spessard, F. E. Stengle. 
Con., Florence Mentz, Ivan Ressler. 



Dr. Lawrence Keister has been a 
visitor at the home of^ his sister, 
Mrs. Mills, the pa3t week. 



Slip (Elumtan IGiteranj ^nrtetjj 








Urbatum Batten, (Enllnjc 




ttqut&fa tit? hnnnr nf tjmtr ntearnrr 




at tta 




3fartg-i>erflnii Amuttfrsarg 




Jffrtnan, rnr-ntng, Nnurmhrr tutpntit-arrmtn 




mnftrrn Ifttnurrn ann trur-lur 




at rtgfyt n'rlnrk 




lEnrjlr (•Innar-ruatnry 





COLLEGE NEWS 



Y. M. C. A. Notes 

Mr. Evan W. Thomas, State Y. 
M. C. A. secretary, visited the loc°l 
organization last Wednesday. He 
met the cabinet on Thursday morning, 
and encouraged the beginning of work 
among the foreign element west of 
Annville. A committee consisting 
of Messrs. Sherk, Weidler, Rodes, and 
Bowman was appointed to look up the 
matter. 

Mr. Thmoas was well pleased with 
with conditions as existing here. 

In his talk to the students Thursday 
morning at chapel, he emphasized the 
claims of the Y. M. C. A. on the 
young men, and urged them to pursue 
clean and noble lives. 

The class in Bible Study met for 
the first time Sunday morning, in the 
new church. The book to be studied 
will be decided on this week, and will 
be here for the first Sunday in 
December. 

Conservatory Notes 

Miss Dora Ryland, '15 was 
pleasantly surprised on Tuesday by a 
visit from her sister, Miss Ryland. 

Mr. Clarence Barnet, '15 enter- 
tained his unc'e, Mr J. J. Noonan, of 
New York City, on Thursday. 

Mr. Robert S. Renner, teacher of 
violin in Bethlehem, Pa , visited the 
Conservatory recently. 

Miss Tasie Shaak, Avon Pa., a 
teacher in the public schools at Pres- 
cott, is amcng thuse recently enrolled 
for piano. 

Mr. G. Frederick Botts, who was 
reported convalescent last week is 
with us again. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday, Nov. 1, 
was in charge of Miss Florence 
Clippinger, "Missions in South 
America" were discussed, this field of 
work is especially interesting because 
the Y. W. C. A. is helping to 
support Miss Irene Shepherd, who is 
the Secretary at Bueuos Aires. 
Letters and pamphlets from 
missionaries of many lands were read, 
showing the progress as well as the 
needs of all missionary work. 
After the meeting, an offering for 
missions was taken. 

This was the close of the week of 



prayer for missions. Each day at 
12:45 for the past week, the Y. W. C. 
A. girls have held a short meeting, 
studying the missions of some country 
or countries and praying for them. 
The few minutes spent have been 

Get Your Jewelry at the College 
Book Store 

A full line of Gold and Sterling Silver Seal 
Pins, Rings, Fobs and cuff Links. 

HARNISH an d SMITH, Mgrs., 

D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets, 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 

"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un^ 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS, 

26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 9 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KIN PORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 



LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F«a 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES, ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa, 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

'Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EIW STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



II RECOjnjnENDHTION HBENCY 

Although paragraphs 6 and G of our contract 
refer respectively to KECOMMEN DATIONS and 
NOTIFICATIONS, yet this Agency is almost 
entirely aRECOMMEN DATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions wo have been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time to hearsay or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up* 

We ate in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



profitable, for each girl has a broader 
outlook upon this great work. 

The Y. W. C. A. has taken a 
pledge of ten dollars towards the new 
church. 

Calendars finished in the college 
colors, containing pictures of Pres. 
Gossard, the foot ball squad and 
familiar scenes around school, are 
being published by the Y. W. C. A. 



Biological Field Club 

On Wednesday evening an exceed- 
ingly fine program was rendered be- 
fore the Field Club. It consisted of 
two short numbers. Prof. Grimm, 
first gave us a talk on the scientific 
side of the Chestnut Blight. He 
explained the life history of the 
plant and told something of his 
experience as a chestnut Blight 
scout of Pa. 

Mr. Albert Barnhart followed with 
a veiy interesting discussion of 
Blight in its practical aspect. He 
gave data from his own observations, 
illustrating with many fine specimens. 
The discussions and questions by the 
club added interest and the entire 
program was very instructive and 
entertaining. The attendance wa3 
very good. 



Items of Interest 



Miss Lucinda Potter, r.f York, 
was the guest of Lester A. Rhodes, 
'14, Saturday. 

Mr. Paul Oiwiler, of York, visited 
his brother Howard, Sunday. 



iumni 



Roy Guyer '08 has won his letters 
playing on the football team of the Y. 
M. C. A. Training School. Springfield, 
Mass., from which school he will 
graduate this year. 

I. Moyer Hershey and wife were 
the guests of Mrs. [Freed, the latter's 
sister, Sunday. ^ 



W, D, ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty, 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

eh an 0*1 1/ alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art ^Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalog tie 
Sftev. S. D. Sossardj {President 
^nnvilicj SPa. 

BOHKE TflEQLHH 



SEDIIHHBY 



DAYTON, O, 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" o* 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap" 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Persona 1 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 



Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LAN DIS 



Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Poiyteshnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N-Y. 



CLIONIAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



COIiIiEGE flF 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLF^ 



— 

Volume |V. Annville, Pa., 


Tuesday, November 26, 1912 




Entered as second-class matter November 12 


, 1910, at the post office at Aunville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 







Clionian Literary Society 

Celebrates 43d Anniversary 



The forty second Anniversary of the 
Clionian Literary Society was cele 
brated on Friday evening, Nov. 22. 
Contrary to custom, this Anniversary 
was not held on Thanksgiving evening, 
and the change proved successful for 
the largest crowd ever seen at a Clio 
Anniversary, was present. 

The occasion was one of extreme 
pleasure to members and friends of 
the society. The chapel was most 
beautifully decorated in garlands of 
fresh vines ajid paper crysanthemums. 
Palms and flowers ^[completed the 
decoations. 

The program was well rendered and 
the speakers, in* the selection and 
working out of their subjects showed 
originality of~thought. In delivery they 
manifested courage and poise. Each 
number was interesting and well 
given, and the attention of the 
audience was held throughout. The 
musical numbers were exceptionally 
good. 

The reception held in the Ladies' 
Hall after the program was charming 
and showed the superior ability of 
the "other sex" as hostesses. The 
parlors were prettily decorated in 
gold and white, and "the inner man" 
was most delightfully supplied. 
Keim's orchestra furnished music 
for the reception and program. The 
entire affair was very successful. 

The anniversary program is as fol- 
lows: March, Lance and Shield, L. 
P. Laurendeau ; Invocation, President 
Gossard; Concert, Berceuse, Ludwig 
Schytte; President's Address, ' ' A God 
Within," Edith M. Lehman; Piano, 
Der Elkong, Schubert-Hoffmann, Vel- 




Edith Lehman '13 



ma Heindel; Oration, "The Servant 
in the House", Lottie M. Spessard; 
Oration, A New Reformation, Eliza- 
beth Rechard; Duet, Hear Me, Norma, 
Bellini, Edith A. Gingrich. Lottie M. 
Spessard; Reading, Edith's Flight 
and Triumph, Dickens, Selection from 
"Dombey and Son", Edna E. Yarkers; 
Oration, The Other Side, Sara E. 
Zimmerman; Chorus, Forget-Me-Not, 
Olyward, Girls' Glee Club; Overture, 
The Golden Septre, R. Schlepegrell. 

A God Within 

Man's work depends upon the force 
of the powers within him. Life's 
greatest teachers are chiefly heart- 
hungers, for man's wish is but the 
prophecy of that which he is capable 
of accomplishing. An intense desire 
transforms a possibility into a reality. 
Enthusiasm is the basis of action. 
It is the cradle of victory. Without 
it effort is vain and labor is barren. 



As the mighty torrent of the mountain 
ruthlessly sweeps aside all objects 
from its pathway, carries away debris 
and purifies stagnant shallows, so will 
a great enthusiasm for a noble cause 
overpower all obstacles, brush away 
all barriers and flood and rectify all 
faults. When reason approaches its 
task under the inspiration of 
enthusiasm and love, nature yields 
up all her secrets. These yearnings 
within are the springs of man's pro- 
gress without. 

The secret of eminence in the realm 
of industry, art or learning is this: 
the worker has wrought with a persis- 
tent spirit and a luminous mind. 
Under the inspiration of enthusiasm 
the imagination of the poet, the soul 
of the musician, the dream of the re- 
former and the reason of the orator, 
glow and kindle into radiance from 
the light and heat within. 

Here is the poet, Tennyson, inspired 
by love, his imagination aflame, pro- 
ducing the immortal elegj for his 
friend, Arthur Hal lam, passing from 
doubt into peace through a realization 
of^the use of sorrow, leaving the lesson 
for mankind. Here is the boy, Mo- 
zart, toiling through the day at hated 
tasks, stealing into the old church 
at twilight, to pour out his soul 
over the keys of the organ and to 
sob out his mournful melodies, which 
will sing to the joys and sorrows of 
mankind through all time. Here is 
Lincoln, with his hunger for know- 
ledge, late in the night rolling another 
log upon the blazing hearth, and 
midst the grateful heat, searching 
with his eager eyea, the truth 



COLLEGE NEWS 



along, the printed page, until his 
mind grows rich and strong, and the 
emancipator of a race is prepared 
for tuture service. Here is the 
orator, rising to plead the cause of 
savage and slave to men whose hearts 
are hard and cold. But the love of 
the suffering and down-trodaen brother 
man is in Wendell Philip's heart, 
shines in his eyes and pleads in his 
voice till the multitude is swayed by 
his power and his pain becomes their 
pain and his indignation, theirs. 
Truly it is well, to call such en- 
thusiasm a "god within." 

In history the greatest reform 
movements, social, religious and 
political have been brought about in 
response ^to a national enthusiasm. 
Emerson says: ''Every great and 
commanding movement in the annals 
of the world is the triumph of some 
enthusiasm. Nothing great was ever 
achieved without it." The Renaiss- 
ance did not mean a single Dante nor 
a single Bocaccio but a national 
awakening and "a God Within" all 
minds. The Reformation was not bro't 
about by ^Luther alone but by a un- 
iversal animation of all heart and 
conscience through the God Within. 
The secret of eminence in scholarship 
is likewise the result of an over mas- 
tering passion. Every year the doors 
of our colleges swing wide to admit 
the youth of the land. The library 
shelves are heavy with treasure for 
the mind, but only the eager will 
harvest it. Beauty and knowledge 
sleep everywhere but only eager minds 
will find it. Mrs. Browning says: 

"Earth's crammed with Heaven, 
Every bush is aflame with God. 
Those who see take off their shoes, 
The rest sit around and pick black 
berries. " 

Youth stands in the midst of the 
useful and beautiful ; he is surrounded 
with the facts of history and sience; 
the breathes the very atmosphere of 
refinement and culture but he who 
dwells in this environment uninfluenc- 
ed, who is not inspired to nobler aims 
and greater achievements might well 
be the savage in the jungle of Africa 
whose soul dies in silence^ and starva- 
tion. "Ignorance is a want of mental 
animation." Behold the enthusiasm 
with which Milton or Epictetua 
stormed the gates of knowledge. 




Lottie M. Spessard '13 



Be sure that for the student, 
enthusiasm is indeed a "God Within." 

Thus in all the activities of life, 
enthusiasm becomes a motive power, 
the beacon light of the future man. 
Rightly directed, it gives the ability 
to do, to learn and to be something 
useful, fine and noble. With this 
god within our breasts, his enthusiasm 
in our hearts, our narrow little idols 
are thrown down and we set up in 
their places, diviner ideals, by which 
we are given new visions of the thrones 
of heaven and earth. 

These exercises tonight celebrate 
the birth, forty two years ago of the 
Clionian Literary Society. For nearly 
half a century the young women of 
the college have been striving to 
maintain the standards of ideals which 
were cherished by that little band of 
girls back in 1870. Our motto— 
" Virtute et Fide" remains unchang- 
ed. It is a noble aim, worthy of the 
efforts of those former Clios and with 
the greater problems confronting 
American womanhood, today— it is 
increasingly worthy of our efforts 
now. To those former Clios, whether 
here tonight, or in the farthest corner 
of the continent we owe an unbounded 
appreciation of their contributions to 
the society and we beseech their con- 
tinued interest. 

Now, in behalf of the present 
members of the Clionian Literary 
Society, it is my pleasuie to extend 
to one and all a cordial welcome to 
these Anniversary exercises. 

Vera Myers went home to attpnd 
the funeral of her grandmother Rev. 
Mrs. W. H. Wagner, Carlisle. 



The Servant in the House 

A hundred years ago, household in- 
dustry as carried on in the average 
household, included the production of 
everything used by the family. All 
the women helped prepare as well as 
cook all the food consumed. They 
wove, spun, and did everything that 
proved needful to home comforts. In 
short, they changed raw material into 
forms suitable for consumption. 

Modern improvements and ideas, 
however, have lessened the hardships 
of the household. Factory system has 
transplanted home production, thereby 
taking from the home not only pro- 
duce, but also producer. 

This fact is common knowledge. 
But the changes produced in the 
social and moral conditions of the 
Priscilla of yesterday are apt to be 
overlooked in our hurried and im- 
patient attempt to solve our annoying 
and provoking domestic problem. 

We are not attempting to produce 
a definite or fixed solution for the 
so-called "servant problem," but 
rather to present a few conditions 
existing among the classes concerned, 
and which, if rationally taken and ob- 
served, might shed a different light 
upon our domestic opinion. 

The Puritan dame referred to, was 
so esteemed, in her day, for her in- 
dustrial integrity and diligence that a 
mighty warrior and statesman failed 
in his suit for her hand. The girl, 
to-day, whose duty it is to perform 
similar tasks, is looked upon as a 
menial whether she possess integrity, 
virtue, or vanity. She is a social 
outcast; not a despised vagabond, only 
a simple, — servant. She is a good 
servant or a bad servant, accordingly 
as we choose to view her. She is 
always "the hired girl," seldom "a 
woman. " 

This woman has originated from the 
same stock as her factory sister, yet 
the social identity of the two is as two 
distinct species. Such are the condi- 
tions that have developed out of the 
industrial changes mentioned before. 
The industrial woman has naturally 
selected that field of labor most 
fitting her inclinations and social 
ambition. 

It is proper therefore in ° ur 
judgment of the so called "servant, 
to review a few of the resulting con- 



C O LL E G E NEWS 



ditions, social^andjj'ndustrial, that 
have risen in the home, 'factory, and 
elsewhere. 

It is evident that industrial 
changes have affected household 
employment quite materially. They 
have left the upper and middle classes 
unemployed, and the lower classes 
overburdened. In the industries and 
professions, the supply of labor is 
greater than the demand; while in 
domestic service, the demand is great- 
er than the supply. 

We ask ourselves the reason for 
this. It is simply because many 
women oftimes feel free from the 
necessity of labor. The pernicious 
theory'has given birth to the idea that 
the rich should not work lest they 
crowd out those who need it. This 
theory overlooks the fact that every 
person should be a producer. It is 
based on the assumption of work 
being a curse rather than a blessing. 
Why should idleness be practically 
regarded as a vice in men and virtue 
in women, " 

"The actual woman cannot see why 
the work which society calls the most 
honorable a woman can do, when done 
in her own house without remunera- 
tion, becomes demeaning when done in 
the house of another." She sees the 
strict line drawn between the social 
life of the industrial and domestic 
girl, consequently, seeks the life of 
excitement, city life, and the society 
of home friends. Sad to say, this is 
what she considers life. As said be- 
fore, a great distinction is made be- 
tween the society of these two classes 
of girls. The factory employee 
usually considers the domestic girl a 
servant, a name which every employee 
despises and few deserve. 

In the South no white girl will 
work in the home because she is 
placed on a level with the negroes 
and is in the so-called "low society." 
They leave the household and go into 
cotton-picking so they can live in 
idleness for a time. 

Twenty eight per cent of all 
domestic employees ha^e been pre- 
viously employed in other occupations. 
A few of the reasons which they have 
given for change to house work are : 
preference for the work, more leisure 
time, and better social conditions; 



while others continue to choose the 
factory andjshopj^emploment because 
of pride, mure leisure, chance for 
promotion, and a better social stand- 
ing. This latter group of girls is 
seeking the environment of the factory 
and not the road to good housekeeping 
and a homemaking for themselves, 
even though they do not save as much 
as the domestic girl which is due to 
their social life. 

Again, many of the domestic ser- 
vants have that position because they 
lack education for anything else. It 
has been well said that "thru the in- 
troduction of machinery ignorant 
labor has been utilized rather than 
created. ' We should not allow such 
a statement t to be true. Since there 
are no schools for the training of 
domestic servants, the girl should 
enter the home as one of the family 
and there receive her training. But 
this is often impossible since many of 
the mistresses know less than the ser- 
vant. The girl who is aware of the 
fact that she knows more than her 
mistress will never try to improve 
and, probably, will never do her best. 

Housewives often complain that: 
they cannot find a girl, or they can- 
not keep a girl ; their girl knows 
nothing or is no good. Many a girl 
is discharged because of her in- 
efficiency, and yet, because she may 
have a widowed mother or an invalid 
sister dependent upon her, will be 
furnished with an excellent recom- 
mendation. Thus she is shifted from 
one house wife to another, never re- 
ceiving any training, or advice for 
improvement. Those estimable ladies 
do nothing to help make the life of a 
servant happy or homelike. They de- 
prive her of the privileges of a home. 

Perhaps one mistress gives her ser- 
vant the key to the side door and 
never cares when she comes in. 
Another is strict and will not allow 
her girl to wear frizzles or bangs, nor 
will she even allow a man-caller. 
That girl will meet her man-caller 
elsewhere. What is the trouble when 
a maid is sent out to accompany the 
daughter and returns alone? Doesn't 
she need protection also? 

These are only a few instances of 
hundreds of thousands of poor girls 
who have had no advantages, through 



an abundance of hard knocks. 

Many "tragedies" of life may be 
found among the domestics. Some 
have planned for teaching, medicine, 
or other professions, but have been 
sadly disappointed thru some misfor- 
tune. If the lives of many domestics 
were known, they would no longer 
be the "butt of jest and ridicule" 
as they are now portrayed in carica- 
tures, moving pictures, and oftimes 
in novels. 

The time is rapidly coming when 
not only will a mistress demand of 
a domestic applicant a writ of 
commendation from her previous 
employer, but when she too will 
have to produce a signed statemnent 
of 'good behavior from her most 
recent kitchen favorite. 



A New Reformation 

A few years ago a court room in 
one of our western states was crowded. 
Every one was anxiously waiting 
for the verdict, guilty or not guilty. 
The jury at last entered and a sen- 
tence of life imprisonment was im- 
posed. Upon whom? A boy of 
eleven, who, it was alleged, had com- 
mitted murder. Many, many times 
in this, a just country, have little 
children been thrown into jail in com- 
pany with vile criminals. 

Their offense,, often, has been 
small, the prison term short, perhaps, 
but what did that period with jail 
associates mean? While there, these 
children grow and their minds develop. 
They begin to think of the deed they 
have committed and of the punishment 
meted out to them by the court. 
What influence will this time for 
thought have on their after life? 
Will they come out with a penitent 
andjjhumble spirit or will their attitude 
be that of Jean Valjean the principal 
character in Victor Hugo's great novel 
"Les Miserables?" 

On leaving prison, Jean said, "The 
word has committed a crime against 
me. It has taken the best years of 
my life. The world has killed my 
life and the only thing left is to have 
revenge. I will murder, burn, kill 
and slay." Let us pause for a 
moment and look at that life. When 
yet a lad, Jean's sister was left a 
widow with seven children, Jean had 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuis 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKF.RS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 
General 
J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 

Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14| 
PHILO STATTON '15 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



to support the family. Finally a 
time came when he could get no work 
and they had no means with which to 
procure food. At length one day, 
after searching for work and failing 
to find it, Jean broke into the window 
of a baker shop and stole a loaf of 
bread. He was pursued, arrested for 
burglary and sentenced to five years' 
imprisonment. Jean, an uncouth lad, 
was cast into prison with criminals of 
all kinds. What was his schooling 
during that time? He learned to 
read and write; he learned also to 
hate and despise the world. 

After four years he escaped, was 
again captured and a sentence of 
fifteen years' imprisonment was 
imposed. At the end of that time 
he came out with the words quoted 
before "I will murder, burn, kill and 
slay. ' ' But soon after leaving prison, 
Jean began to fight the prison-bred 
thoughts. He tried to put aside the 
feeling of enmity toward the world 
and toward mankind. 

Now, we may ask ourselves what 
caused Jean to wish to become a 
better man and to have a kindly spirit 
toward his fellowmen? One day a 
bishop whom he had robbed, defended 
him and sent away his captors. 
After the officers had gone, the bishop 





r 





Elizabeth rechard '13 



giving him money, said "Jean 
Valjean, my brother, you no longer 
belong to evil but to good. It is your 
soul that I buy for you." After 
this Jean's entire life was spent in 
trying to become an honest man. 
\es, he succeeded; but his years had 
been spent, not in usefulness, but in 
a struggle against himself. Was his 
crime worthy of such a punishment? 
Could a life such as his have been put 
to better use if the right treatment 
for his offense had been given? 

Today we condemn the method 
which allowed a young life to be so 
ruined, yet what are we doing now to 
protect the growing mind from becom- 
ing degenerate? Not a great while 
ago, thinkers came to realize that youth 
can not be judged by the standards 
which hold for adults and accordingly 
they have searched for methods that 
will cause the evil tendencies in 
children to be supressed or to be 
guided in the right direction. 

The first step in advance was the 
trial of the juvenile delinquent in the 
juvenile courts. Judges for these 
courts were carefully selected, men 
learned not only in law, but interested 
in and possessing wide knowedge of 
child psychology. Only too well, 
these men realized that prison and jail 
are no places for child offenders. 

Where to place them was the ques- 
tion which arose. The first House 
of Refuge had been established in 
New York in 1825, but the object of 
such a house was less that of restor- 
ing the child to right living than of 
providing a means of escape from 
temptations. But soon the idea of re- 



forming the character of the young 
transgressor prevailed and then Re- 
form Schools were established. 
Repression rather than development 
of the child marked these attempts 
to care for the culprit. Experience, 
however, has shown that the most 
successful reformtion can be brought 
about by trade training and this fea- 
ture of education has received great 
emphasis in the Industrial Schools 
which have been established. In 
these schools, the child is taught also 
to appreciate the beauties of home 
life; for by means of the "Cottage 
System" he sees how a true home 
should be cared for and what the atti- 
tude of one member should be toward 
another. These Industrial Schools 
have proved their worth and are here 
to stay until conditions are such that 
the first offense will not be committed ; 
and here is where we meet the great 
problem of today, "How shall we pre- 
vent that first offense?" 

It is necessary not only to study the 
child directly but also to weigh the 
tendencies leading to juvenile delin- 
quency. One glance and many causes 
are seen. One of the most important 
of^these is brought about by the 
changing social conditions. Acts that 
are justifiable and desirable in country 
districts may be and have proved to 
be dangerous in the city. Accord- 
ingly laws have been passed which 
prohibit such acts as playing ball and 
building bonfires as they endanger 
the safety of citizens and their pro- 
perty. 

In the home, the youth must be 
taught to respect and obey these laws. 
But a recent development in many of 
our American homes is the abandon- 
ment of the rule of the child. Much 
more do we today see the parent con- 
trolled by his offspring and the law of 
the youth obeyed. Then too, we find 
parental incompetency manifested by 
the failure of parents to recognize 
that conditions have changed and what 
has once been permissible is no 
longer so but is now anti-social. The 
outcome of this situation is very often 
waywardness and crime. 

Again, guilt in the youth has been 
caused by neglect of parents who be- 
cause they are idlers, drunkards 6r 
other worthless characters do not care 
for their children. These children ai 



COLLEGE NEWS 



well as those who are homeless must 
provide for themselves. The food 
which they secure does not give to 
their bodies the elements necessary 
for growth and they become an easy 
prey tj the saloons. The days of 
such children are spent on the streets; 
their nights in boxes and sheds; 
their associates are gamblers, thieves, 
and other wrong doers. Having 
grown up amid these surroundings 
which have caused their moral prin- 
ciples to be debased, we may not 
blame the youth for many of his 
offenseB, but it is our duty to try to 
remove the causes which lead to 
vice. Then the spirit of goodness in 
children will assert itself, needing 
only a guiding hand from us. 

Proper growth and a development of 
children demand a place in the open 
where they may enjoy healthy sports. 
Because the laws of the city forbide 
them the right to play on the public 
highways, public paries and play 
grounds have been instituted to meet 
this need. While they are enjoying 
their games at these places, the youths 
are learning, unconsciously, the first 
steps toward good citizenship, in as 
much as in all that they do, they must 
respect certain rules and the rights of 
their playmates. We should put to 
this use more land, as play and exer- 
cise as well as work keep idle minds 
from mischief. 

In addition to the parks and play 
grounds, another method for reaching 
the boy, is the boys clubs. We have 
always had the club, formed whether 
for a good or a bad purpose. Now 
clubs are being organized which 
operate to attract the boy from the 
street; to give a proper outlet to 
his surplus energy and to teach him 
is duty toward his associates. So 
ar these clubs have met with a cer- 
ain degree of success but they are too 
few and their attractions are not 
sufficiently strong to bring within 
bonds all who should be reached. 

1o offset the amusements afforded 
by the five cent picture shows, the 
Penny arcade, the cheap dance halls 
*nd the pool rooms, entertainments 
ar « being provided within the un- 
'ocked doors of our churches and 
school houses. The gymnasiums and 
fading rooms in the buildings of our 
Christian Associations open wide their 




be taken. Ruskin has said that a 
wise nation obeys its wise men, re- 
strains its fools but cherishes all 



Edna E. Yarkers '13 



doors to every one. 

While such places keep the youth 
from the streets, home is the place 
where they should spend most of their 
time. To insure this, the parents 
must be taught to take an interest in 
the caie of their children, and the 
home must be made attractive. Much 
more will be required of the parent 
of the future than we can expect of 
the fathers and mothers of today for 
perhaps training in these things has 
been lacking. At the present time, 
however, churches and other mission 
are trying to help today's parents 
through mother's meetings, men's 
clubs and individual instruction. To 
obtain the best results from this work 
is difficult, but aided by the schools 
which have introduced domestic 
science and household economy, the 
future mothers are given a little 
training for home life, while by 
means of manual training and minia- 
ture governments which have been 
formed in many schools, the future 
fathers have a trade and the essentials 
for the life of a good citizen. 

A move to save the child has been 
started; there is much remaining to 
be done. Our standing as a world 
power today demands that we educate 
physically and morally as well as in- 
tellectually today's children who will 
be tomorrow's citizens. We want 
good homes and pure lives. Since 
we have begun in the work of 
character building, we must eontinue 
in the movement to educate aright 
and to so hedge in the youth with good 
influence that he must yield to it and 
then the first downward step will not 



Reading 

One of the most delightful numbers 
on the program was the reading by 
Miss Yarkers. Miss Yarkers showed 
her ability as a reader and the hard 
work which it must have taken to 
prepare such a heavy and difficult 
number. The reading was a cutting 
from Charles Dicken's "Dombey and 
Sao"— "Edith's Fight and Triumph." 

The synopsis of the story is as 
follows : 

Edith, the proud and beautiful 
daughter of Mrs. Skewton is forced to 
marry the wealthy Mr. Dorobey. 
Edith's love for Mr. Dombey's abused 
daughter, her haughty bearing, his 
coldness and their unyielding spirits 
make their married life very unhappy. 
In order to force his commands upon 
Edith, Mr. Dombey uses Carker, as his 
tool, who persues her until, notwith- 
standing her hatred for him, one night 
in despair she flings her jewels at 
Dombey's feet and flees with Carker. 

The night of their flight Edith and 
Carker separate to meet some days 
later in a French hotel. Edith alone, 
arrives at the hotel first. Carker 
arrives and is about to embrace Edith 
when she picks up a knife from the 
table and orders him to stand still. 
Carker cannot understand her action 
for he feels that she is in his power. 
The tide soon turns. Carker stands be- 
fore her cowering while she paints 
him as a villain of the blackest dye. 

When Edith has finished her denun- 
ciation she varns Carker that he has 
been betrayed and that her husband 
is on his tracks. Edith leaves the 
room and Carker follows to use 
brutal force upon her. She cannot be 
found. Carker recognizes Dombey's 
voice in the hall and like a madman 
rushes from one room to another. 
At last he escapes through a secret 
passage. A few days later Carker is 
killed by a locomotive before the eyes 
of Mr. Dombey. 

The Other Side 

"No man liveth to himself." In 
the history of men and times no state- 
ment has oftener been proven. Noth- 
ing can be more subtle or more cer- 
tain than the influence we exert, and 



COLLEGE NEWS 



yet no fact is more lightly regarded. 
The little coral bodies, as they die, 
build, biYby bit, a structure which at 
last breaks the surges of the ocean. 
Man, as he lives, builds a structure 
which somewhere will lift itself amid 
the tide of human affairs. Circles 
of influence radiate from every life 
and who can tell where they will 
cease? One day the structure goes 
down, it is lost to view, but the spot 
of it dissappearance we know from the 
ripples in the tide. Napoleon lives 
still in Franca, though his body has 
long been at rest on the banks of the 
Seine. Martin Luther still speaks in 
the churches of Christendom. Shakes- 
peare, Byron and Milton live in their 
influence for good or evil. 

The fact of influence remains, but 
there is another truth to consider. In 
this structure which we raise there is 
a side we call surface and there is 
another side. As the voyager 
traverses the wide seas and looks upon 
the coral island he sees it's surface 
aspect in it's perfection or imperfec- 
tion—the great foundation which sup- 
ports it is entirely lost to view. In 
just this way the world has always 
judged the human structure— by the 
side most easily seen. Every man is 
a benefactor or a malefactor according 
to his deeds. But, in the light of the 
history of centuries, has the world 
always proved a just judge? It has 
not. Subsequent search and inquiry 
have proved many wrong decisions, yet 
the method of proceedure goes on in 
spite of this truth. 

Ages ago, the world 's'gieatest phil- 
osopher walked the streets of Athens 
and taught the youth of that day. 
History says that 'Socrates lived a 
noble life and died an heroic death and 
the world writes after his name— bene- 
factoi. After that of Xanthippe his 
wife it writes— malefactor. So great 
is the odium that has come to be at- 
tached to that name that even the 
philanthropic college professor will 
say instinctively "Do not attempt to 
redeem Xanthippe, her name has gone 
down in history." But does not his- 
tory contain many names 'hat are re- 
deemable. The professors' views how- 
ever, are those of the world ; the vote 
which condemns is nearly unanimou 8 
—she has had few to plead her cause 
through all these years. One writer, 




Sara Zimmerman '13 



now and then, has ventured to 
suggest that perhaps she was not as 
badly disposed as she is pictured but 
these remarks have been been so 
faint that they have scarcely been 
heard. These writers, doutless re- 
member that Greece in the day of her 
highest culture and brilliancy was 
painfully afflicted with the malady of 
gossip which had crept into her very 
life. They remember too, that the 
records of Socrates wife came for the 
most part from those who admired 
hire and were his friends, and they 
took careful note of every hindrance 
which brightened and strengthened his 
virtues. 

Whatever might have been the 
faults of Xanthippe or her virtues, 
we do not come to praise her. "The 
evil that men do lives after them— 
the good is oft interred with their 
bones." Shakespeare and other 
philosophers have told us Xanthippe 
possessed a sharp tongue'and a fiery 
temper, — that she mistreated and 
abused the unoffending philosopher. 
If this is true, surely these were 
grievous faults, and grieviously hath 
Xantippe answered them. 

Tonight under leave of all these 
honorable men we come — not to 
praise Xanthippe, but to redeem her. 
Shall we say that Socrates whom the 
oracle voted the 'wisest of men,' who 
could read the heart and thoughts of 
the shrewdest of those who questioned 
and tried to entangle him was utterly, 
mistaken in his views of a woman? 
Surely not. A man of so much wisdom 
had never been attracted by a 
Xanthippe with the attributes the 



world seems to know as well. It wa=s 
the presence of a good side which 
attracted him. If then, the 
maliciousness with which she is 
credited afterwards came into pro- 
minence, there is surety a reason for 
it. Had Socrates sought the cause 
earnestly, doubtless he would have 
found it within himself. 

Our hearts go out in sympathy as 
we hear him liken his wife to the 
thunder which having spent its force, 
dies gradually away—and once, we 
are told, impersonating the storm in 
all its completeness, she accompanied 
the thunder with the torrential down- 
pour. Alas! for Socrates and his 
doctrines! If he, person? lly, did not 
believe in cleanliness, Xanthippe did 
not hesitate in showing her disfavor 
of the "Great— Unwashed." 

But we have come to redeem— not 
to pity. If we were to attempt such 
a task with no other information than 
that gleaned from the ancients in alj 
its meagerness and obscurity 'twould 
perhaps be difficult, but in a modern 
light it is quite easy. For human 
nature is precisely the same today as 
it was in that far-distant day. When 
we are dealing with our modern 
Xanthippe we are dealing with the 
prototype. Customs and conventions 
have changed, it is true, but the 
unconventionality of a hatless, a coat- 
less, a shoeless philosopher husband 
woud have its effect upon the nerves 
of the ancient woman as well as the 
modern. Socrates was a man of as 
many eccentricities as Samuel John- 
son. For days, it is said, he would 
eat no food, since it did not satisfy 
the soul which was his chief concern. 
Other peculiarities give us an insight 
into his nature. In fact, his strange 
views and actions Xanthippe could 
neither understand nor appreciate. 
Doubtless, she tried reform, but 
aggravated and outweighed by 
philosophical arguments, which she 
could not fathom, her strength of 
endurance gave way and she suffered 
what the world chooses to call ''out- 
bursts of wrath." Physicians would 
prefer "over-wrought nerves" and 
would come nearer the truth. 

Some-one said that a genius makes 
a poor husband— if Socrates is an ^ 
representative there must be truth i" 
the statement. A fallible being v*' 11 



COLLEGE NEWS 



fail somewhere and right at this point 
Socrates failed. He had a mistaken 
view of duty. All his efforts were 
spent in carrying out the will of the 
gods and the State. He forgot the 
starting point of charity. His one 
great duty, omnipresent and omnipo- 
tent obscured that which should have 
been nearest~and most vital. Gladly 
would he have laid down his life as a 
sacrifice tcr the Gods or to the Athens 
which be so'much loved ; but to main- 
tain the life directly dependent on him 
troubled him not. The money which 
men would have given him for his 
teaching he refused, for extreme self- 
denial was part of his creed. Often 
having spent the day in the Athenian 
square he would accept the invitation 
of a friend and turn his steps not 
homeward, but elsewhere. Incidents 
of this kind only tended to'heighten 
the imperfect sympathy already 
existing and gave cause, more and 
more, for an unfortunte condition of 
affairs which modern society terms 
"incompatibility." Behind the word 
lies a world of domestic unhappiness. 
All philosophy is agreed on one point 
—the philosopher neglected his home. 
While his three sons were educated 
by the state, the family as far as we 
know, lived in poverty. We have 
ample room for sympathizing with the 
mother who was solicitous for her 
children. Her interest lay in her 
home— that of her husband lay be- 
yond it. Even at his death-scene 
when his friend Crito accused him 
of acting selfishly in not wishing to live 
'or his sons he replied that obedience 
to the laws of the state was of more 
importance to him. He trusted his 
family to his friends. Thus he died 
with a wrong conception of duty and 
in the death in which he sought to 
rove himself unselfish, proved him- 
self supremely selfish. 

More than two thousand years have 
rolled way since the days of the first 
Xanthippe, and the world, still hold s 
those whom it calls unredeemable. In 
he confused throng which hurries to 
a nd fro we meet similar dispositions 

Get Your Jewelry at the College 
Book Store 

A full line of Gold and Sterling Silver Seal 
Pins, Rings, Fobs and cuff Links. 

H ARNISH and SMITH, Mgr s,, 



—natures strong, passionate and bold, 
eyes which dart forth a treacherous 
light, faces even presaging ill to him 
whom fate condemns to share their 
love or hate, 

"blending in a like degree 

the vixen and the devotee," 

In these lives it is not given us to 



You get only the 


best at 


COLLAM'S 


Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ 


Quality 


Main Street 





D. B. SHIFFER 



Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets, 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 

"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un* 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality- 
Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS- 

26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KiNPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddlck 



LIVERY 
First Class Teams to 
Hire 

F>artie« a Specialty 
M- F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F"« 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO, 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St, Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

■'Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BQYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



11 HECOfflEPJITION AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and 6 of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATIONS and 
NOTIFICATIONS, yet this Agency is almost 
entirely aRECOMMENDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time to hearsay or newspaper 
vacancies. 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up* 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



know what threads the fatal aistera 
spun, what forges the cruel chain of 
moods and holds the love within them 
mute. Unconsciously we find our- 
selves asking that eternal child— ques- 
tion— why? Why should they tread a 
troubled path with life-long discord? 
Our question is merely a recognition 
of the immutable law which governs 
all nature—that of cause and effect. 
Nothing expresses itself in the natural 
world, nothing in the world of human 
nature for which there is not cause. 
When we defend our Xanthippe 
of olden time we do not seek to 
disprove her faults or condone them, 
we merely find them the expression 
of causes which would figure in 
justifying them. We take into con- 
sidertion the other side. How are 
we able tc judge fairly unless we do 
just this thing? How wrong is our 
judgement oft-times because we con- 
sider merely the surface. The work- 
ings of the heart and brain of man- 
kind we cannot know, what looks to 
us a stain may be only a scar brought 
from some well-fought battle. That 
look, that manner which aggravates 
us may be a token of some foe which 
the soul combated. That fall which 
we despise may be, has been permitted 
that thft life may rise and take a 
firmer stand. 

The world still judges one-side, 
but it is growing broader minded as 
the days go by. It has its apostles of 
enlightened vision and these are 
striving to do away with the old 
system. The word unredeemaole 
applied to human nature is never used 
by them: with the spirit of kindness 
they cope with the most difficult situa- 
tions; they search for the other side 
if the surface seems to be evil. 
These are the final emancipators of 
all phases of our national life-they 
are our really great men and women. 

"Sympathetic knowledge" says 
Jane Addams, "is the only approach 
to any human problem," a knowledge 
of two sides viewed in the spirit of 
true charity. These words come 
from the heart of one who is giving 
her energes,— yea, her life to the 
searching out of the other side in 
lives and conditions which seem well- 
nigh hopeless. 

How great are the possibilities of 
the other side! Only those directly 
engaged in searcing it out know fully 
its value, but these can tell and they 
tell us that every life and every condi- 
tion has its other side and not only 
in what is fair and good, 
"but in the darkest, meanest things 
there alway, alway, something 
sings." 



W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon 7/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
$fev. S. 0. Sossard, {President 
jtnnvilie, !Pa. 

BOHEBRflKE THEOLOGICAL 



DAYTON, O. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



OFFERS i COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" of 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 

Address the President, 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, 92.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polylechnio Institute 

SCHOOL of \\ 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Sand for a Catalogue. TROY. H'V 



ENGINEERING 



COIiliEGE JiEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume jV. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, December 3, 1912 



No. 5 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post ofllce at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Resume of 

Foot Ball Season 

MOST SUCCESSFUL IN RECENT 
YEARS 

In the foot ball season just closed 
L. V. carried off honors of which she 
can be very proud. The men who de- 
fended the Blue and White acquitted 
themselves very creditably. When the 
year opened, but five of last year's 
varsity reported. The rest were 
nearly all new men. Coaches Wilder 
and Pritchard soon had a strongly 
organized bunch of men. 

Out of nine games played we won 
four, lost four and tied one. Follow, 
ing is a brief review of these games. 

The Carlisle Indians won the first 
game by the score of 45-0. This 
score by no means shows the compara- 
tive strength of the teams. The red- 
skins piled up 38 of their points in 
the first two periods, while in the 
second period they were only able to 
get one touchdown. 

The second game was with Gettys- 
burg. We lost 6-0. This game 
brought out our weak points which 
were soon remedied. Were it not for 
an unfortunately poor decision of the 
referee we would have added another 
tie to our string instead of a defeat. 

The third game resultrd in a tie 
score 0-0. It was with Delaware 
State College. This game would 
have resulted in victory had it not 
been for several misplays, near the 
goal. 

The fourth and biggest game of 
the year was won by L. V. It was 
the Albright game, score 10-7. L. 
V. played an uphill game ar.d won 
out in the last quarter. 

The fifth was a walkover for 
Dickinson score 53 -3. The fellows 
Were nearly all in poor physical con- 
dition owing to the strenuous game 



with Albright the week before. 

The Indian Reserves were 'snowed 
under in the next game by the score 

The seventh game resulted in an 
overwhelming victory over Highspire 
A. C. to the tune of 102-0. 

The eighth game Albright copped 
by the score 20-7. Here another 
patched up line-up faced the Red and 
White. A scrub eleven held the 
heavy Albright team to a com- 
paratively low score. 

The last game resulted in a victory 
over Millersville State Normal by the 
score of 39-3. 

All told Lebanon Valley scored 174 
points as against 137 against her. 
The following men won their L. V. 
Manager Richie, Kirkpatrick, DeHuff, 
Larew, Mackert, Gonder.Von Beregly, 
Dearolf, Pell, Dayhoff, Snavely, 
Statton, Strickler, Walter, Charlton. 
The following won scrub letters: 
Schmidt, Mickey, Evans, McNelly, J. 
Long, M. Long, and Brenneman. 

The tollvving is the weight, 
and height of the varsity squad. 

weight height 
Kirkpatrick 153 5.10 

Dayhoff 187 6.00 

Larew 165 5.08 

Mackert 195 6.02 

Gonder 192 5.10 

Evans 170 5.10 

Von Beregly 210 6.02 

Dearolf 178 6.00 

Pell 175 5.11 

Dehuff 158 5.08 

Mickey 166 6.00 

Snavely 180 5.11 

Statton 175 6.00 

Strickler 165 5.11 

Walters 150 5.07 

Charlton 180 5.10 

NEW FOOT BALL CAPTAIN 
At a meeting of t he L. V. men 
yesterday Paul L. Strickler of the 
class of 1914 was elected foot bail 
captain for the season of 1913. The 
news congratulates "Polly" heartily 
and wishes him much success. 



The Dead to Life Again 

An old college custom has revived 
during the past week, and has sprung 
into newness of life. This is the 
ringing of the college bell. For 
several years this old voice has re- 
mained silent, but now speaks with 
a tongue of joy, portending good for 
the future. 

Every morning the bell rings from 
8:40 to 8:45, during which time stu- 
dents gather in the chapel for daily 
worship. The students and faculty 
rejoice in the revival of this old 
custom. 



President's Reception 

Dr. and Mrs Gossard entertained 
the faculty and wives of the faculty at 
a reception in their home on Saturday 
evening. It was a most delightful 
affair and a charming evening was 
spent by the faculty members and 
their wives. Rev. Spayd, our college 
pastor and Mrs. Spayd were present. 
Most elaborate refreshments were 
served in the dining hall of their 
home. 



Alma Mater 

Learn the new Alma Mater song. 
Copies of it can be purchased from 
Mr. Charlton. The words and music 
of this song were composed by 
alumni. Add to your college spirit 
the words and sentiments of the song. 



Recital 

A recital will be given by the 
Music and Oratory Departments, 
Tuesday, Dec. 10; 1912 at 8 o'clock, 
in Engle Hall. 



The Tug-of-War was won by the 
Sophomore class, 7-0. The Sophomore 
class had the advantage in having 
a better "pulling" force, but both 
classes deserve credit for their work. 



Dont' forget the Athletic Associa- 
tion election on Thursday at 4 p. m. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN It. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 

Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

In looking back over the last 
twelve "months cf our national his- 
ory, one may ask the question, what 
are the special reasons, why we should 
have the spirit of gratitude to th e 
Giver of all good? It would be ex 
trernely difficult to innumerate all the 
.reasons'why, we as a nation should be 
grateful for the things that we enjoy. 
That another year has been added to 
our peaceful life is in itself a loud 
•call for gratiutde. No great matters 
have broken the even tenor of our 
country during the past year. The 
disputed possessions, the military 
post and morning drum beat have 
not threatened the disruption of 
homes, nor have they drenched any 
section of our country with blood. 
"The dogs of war have been chained 
-and Mars has worn a smile rather 
tthan a " frown." The sensitive 
imoral conscience seen in the process 
.of development every where ells for 
gratitude and appreciation. 

Likewise in looking back over 
the past year of our College hist- 
ory, one finds that many im- 
provements have been made. Ad 
justments have been completed 
vwhich place us on a bigger plain. One 



year ago our Academy bjilding was 
in a dilapidated condition and not 
only detracted from the good appear- 
ance of the college pioperty but was 
an expense. At present it is equally 
as well equipped as any of the other 
buildings and its appearance just as 
good. For this improvement we are 
indebted largely to Professor Derick- 
son. Our Athletic career has been 
changed from one of shamp and igno- 
miny, to one of which we are justly 
prcud. When one reflects for a short 
time it is easy to see man} things for 
which to be thankful. We admire 
the courage of the persons who in the 
face of the greatest difficulties and 
under the most trying circumstances 
have pressed forward until the ideal 
is becoming a reality. 

The next important problem for 
Lebanon Valley to solve, is shall L. V. 
have four terms. This problem has 
been under consideration for the past 
year, and the final decision will be 
reached in the near future. The 
prospects for the four terms at L. V. 
seem to be favorable. In case this 
plan is adopted, the length of the 
terms will be twelve weeks each. 
The first quarter to begin October and 
extend to December. The second 
January to March, the third March 
to June, and the fourth June to Sept- 
ember. This will be so arranged as 
to give vacations aggregating four 
weeks. Each quarter will be as far 
as possible a unit in itself so that 
a student can enter at the beginning 
of any quarter or leave at the end of 
one without serious detriment to his 
work. The adoption of a four quarter 



year, in which each quarter is a 
unit in itself, will make provision 
for two important classes. The first 
of these is the cla3s of persons who 
are everywhere in America admired 
for their solid worth, those students 
who come from the farm. The second 
class consists of those who either 
teach or are pupils in the country 
schools, where the school year covers 
only seven months. The summer 
term would bring many teachers 
whom we could not other wise touch. 
These would be most valuable 
friends, for they would be 
centers of influence for us, and would 
be in a position to make that influ- 
ence count in getting students for 
the regular college course. 



Visitors at Anniversary 

Some of the visitors at the Clio 
Anniversary are as follows: 

Marguerite Engle, Hummelstown; 
Rev. Horn, Red Lion; Miss Ruth 
Davis, Lebanon, Miss Katharine 
Peters, Harrisburg; Alma Walters 
and Mabel Meagely, Lebanon; Miss 
Mary Billows, Steelton; Miss Carrie 
Mathias, Margiet Moser, Susan 
Yeager, Ada Shott, Highspire; Mae 
Homer, '10, Norriston, Ora M. 
Hamish, '06, Philadelphia; Clair 
Hamish, '12; Miss Miriam Carl, 
Harrisburg; Grace Elliot and Grace 
Hollenback, of Shamokin, Miss 
Verda Snyder, Keedysville aid Mis3 
Strayer, of York. Many other 
strange faces were seen at the Anni- 
versary, on Friday an! at the game, 
on Saturday. 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following- address: 

Name 

Street 

City - ■ : • • • • state • ■ 1 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN 

Current even's, John Oakes ; Paper, 

Van Dayhoff ; Extempore, — — 

;Reading, H. H. Charlton; 

Ortaion, B. G. Light Choruss 
Society; dialogue, V. M. Heffelfinger, 
C. Y. Ulnch; Essay. J. B. Lyter. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
IJOration, G. A. Richie; Paper, R. 
Merediz; Debate, Impromptu, 'Affirma- 
tive, W. C. Carl, V. D. Mulhollen. 
Negative, L. B. Harnisb, P. F, 
Roberts; Quartet, L. I. Leister, 
Cedic Rine, Harold Risser, W. C. 
Carl ; Original Farce, Leister, Ness, 
Rine; Living Thoughts, Editor. 
CLION1AN 

Piano solo, Dora Ryland; Current 
Events, Addie Snyder; Contemporary, 
Mary Spayd; Piano solo, May Meyer; 
Paper, Florence Christeson; Original 
story, Blanche Black ; Piano solo, Ora 
Baehman. 



Alumni 



Reba Lehman, '00, librarian in the 
Public Library of Hazelton is visiting 
her parents, Dr. Lehman and wife. 

Artus Kauffman, '11, is the Prin- 
cipal of the High School at Fawn 
"Grove, Pa. 

Elizabeth Lau, '12, attended "The 
World in Baltimore." 

May Hoerner, 10, Norristown 
High Schol, attended the CHonian 
Anniversary and visited a number of 
her friends. 

Donald Keister, '12, is taking a 
graduate course at Harvard. 

|J Select Your Presents at $ 

t Harnish & Smith's I 

{ BOOK STORE t 

■9 © 
A Everything in the Gift Line, and all at £ 
3 Reasonable Prices. c 

^ Parker Fountain Pens. College Jewelry ^ 
9 and Christmas Novelties e 

f at $ 

J Harnish & Smith's J 
J Book Store } 

-%>9^y9^>9^y9 ^>9*^>G^>&-^>&'^ > 



Ora Harnish, '06, Superintendent 
of the Burd School, Philadelphia, was 
a visitor in town over Clio Anniver- 
sary. 

Max Lehman, '07. spent Thanks- 
giving at home. 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 



Quantity ' * ✓ Quality 
Main Street 



D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets, 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING £ BROS. 

26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS 3 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Kagle Hotel Annville, TP a. 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakeiy 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO' 
LATES, ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

J QEGOmHIEPHTION AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and 6 of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATIONS and 
NOTIFICATION'S, yet this Agency is almost 
entirely aRECOMMENDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
has been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we have been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time to hea-say or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up* 

We are in need of more teachers to Supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. MYEFS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Items of Interest 



Miss Mary B. Nissley, a former 
student, visited in Annviile over 
Sunday. 

Messrs. Charlton, Lyters saw the 
Shakespearian play in Harrisburg. 

Miss Dora Roland spent her vacation 
in Mechanicsburg. 

Mrs. Freed spent the vacation with 
her daughter in Philadelphia. 

Miss Florence Christeson and Flor- 
ence Clippinger saw Julia Marlowe 
and Henry Southern play in "Much 
Ado About Nothing" during the 
vacation. 

Miss Florence Mentz, spent Satur- 
day and Sunday with Miss Irwin in 
Harrisburg. 

Mr. Leray B. Harnish, Misses 
Ethel Houser, Edith Lehman, and 
Lottie Spessard saw the great Mis- 
sion ry exposition and pageant en- 
titled 4 'The World in Baltimore." 

Dr. and Mrs. Gossard and Miss 
Minnie Gossard spent the past week 
in Baltimore. 

Sara Zimmerman, '13, spent the 
Thanksgiving recess in Reading. 

Many of the students spent Tanks- 
giving Day at home. 



Joint Session 

The regular monthly joint session 
of the Y. VV. and Y. M. C. A's 
will be held Sunday. The Missionary 
Committees have it in charge 



Rev. Sheridan Garman, '92, of 
Galesburg, 111., who is Presiding 
Elder of that district, died durnig the 
past week of heart failure 



Have You Heard the New 

Alma Mater t 

Music by i. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S, F. Oldham. '02 



HARRY H. CHARLTON 

AGENT 



W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annviile, Pa. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon 7/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. 0. Sossarctj ^President 



GO TO IT BOYS 



DAYTON, O. 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" o f 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as goods 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel oi 
reputation and consequence in 

PH I LADELPH E A 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



SCHOOL of \\ 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Busineis Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

f «nd for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COIiIiEGE~V-£WS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume jjV. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Deeembep TO, 1912 \ 



No. 6 



Kntered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Ministerial Meeting 

The L. V. C. Ministerium met 
for the fourth time during this school 
year on Thursday evening last at 
6:00. This organization has a mem- 
bership of twenty active and three 
honorary members. After the tran- 
action cf business Rev. B. F. 
Daugherty D. D. , pastor of Trinity U. 
B. Church, Lebanon addressed the 
meeting. 

His subject was, ''Qualifications of 
the Christian Minister." The 
following is a synopsis of what the 
speaker said in his discussion of the 
subject. The minister must be a ser- 
vant an the etymolcgy of the word 
suggests. The first qualification 
mentioned was the physical. A man 
who is not strong physically cannot 
succes3fully fill the position of the 
minister. Readiness of speech is a 
very necessary qualification. Any 
minister who uses English incorrectly 
will at once lose the interest of his 
audience. The use of many words 
without presenting ideas is a common 
fault among ministers and ought not 
to be so. He should be able to think 
clearly as well as to present his 
thoughts clearly. The most nece- 
ssary qualification is the spiritual. 
No man should attempt to do the 
duties of a christian minister who 
has not had a pentecost in his own 
lifn. The knowledge of a Special 
call for the work should be the first 
essential. The development of head 
and heart must go together. Further- 
more, the minister must be sociable. 
He should also have financial ability. 
In reference to pulpit work there 
must be preparation. And, above 
all the English and oratory in the 
delivery, there must be present the 
spark of the Holy Ghost. 

The next meeting will be held in 
the assembly room of the Library on 
the evening of Dec. 19th, at which 
time Rev. A. G. Nje will give the 
address. 



Lecture on Ireland 

Dr. E. U. Hoenshel of Dayton, 
Va, who at one time was President 
of Shenandoah Collegiate Institute, 
gave a lecture Tuesday evening, 
in the college chapel. His topic was,. 
"Where the Shamrock grows." He 
first told us of his voyage across the 
Atlantic in the "Majestic" and in 
several beautifully drawn pictures 
showed the calm and tempest of the 
ocean. 

The "Emerald Isle," the greenest 
spot on earth, is 303 niles long and 
177 miles wide with an area of 32,000 
squaie miles. It is commonly known 
as the land of potatoes and pigs but 
Dr. Hoenshel said that there were 
four times as many cattle es pigs, 
and potatoes were scarce. He also 
gave a short history of Ireland, in 
which St-. Patrick came for his share 
of praise. 

The landing place was Queenstown, 
named in honor of Que n Victoria, 
and after running the gauntlet of 
custom officals and Irish peddlers the 
speaker took us with him abroad the 
train for Cork, twelve miles distant. 
The places of interest visited in Cork 
were the Old Shandon church, built 
in 1609, and Blarney Castle dating to 
feudal days. The Old Shandon Bells, 
celebrated in verse, still peal forth 
their pure and silvery t^nes. The 
Blarney Stone still gives the power 
of eloquence to those who hazard their 
lives to kiss it. 

The Lakes of Killarney was the next 
point visited. One interesting thing 
brought out by the speaker was the 
echoes in the gap of Dunlow. Echo 
after echo can be heard from the 
cannon and born far out over the 
country. Dublin was dtscribtd for 
the Phoenix Park and thecemetary; 
also as the home of Sir Thomas 
Moore, and the birthplace of the 
Continued on page 2 



Deutscher Verein 

Last Monday evening, Dec. 2, was 
held the second regular meeting of 
the Deutscher Verein. A splendid 
program was rendered by the members 
of the club, which consists of the 
students of the German classes. A 
paper, a story, a poem and several 
music numbers, all given in German, 
were the special features of the pro- 
gram. After the meeting several 
games and amusements of a German 
or American character were enjoyed. 

The next program will be a Christ- 
mas program. At this session Christ- 
mas songs, Christmas stories and 
the customs of our fatherland at this 
season of the year, will be the feat- 
ures of the program. All lovers of 
German are cordially invited. An 
announcement of the time will be 
made in next week's issue of the 
"News." 



Look Out for the Dixie 
Chorus 

Under the auspices of the Christian 
Associations on Saturday evening, 
December 14th, the Dixie Chorus will 
present a vision of the life's story of 
the Negro. From the jungle to the 
fields of slavery, from the lash and 
shackles to the realization of their 
potent possibilities will be portrayed 
with realistic vividness. They can 
sing, read and perform. Let us 
corre out and hear what they have to 
bring us. 



Calendar 

Tuesday, 6 p. m.— prayer meeting; 
8 00 p. m.— Conservatory and Oratory 
Recital. 

Friday, 7:30 p. rn. — Clio-Kalo 
joint session. 

Saturday, 8 p. m --Star Course, 
" Dixie Chorus". 

Sunday, 1 p. m.-Y. W. and Y. 
M. C. A. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 
J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 
Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

'Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Conservatory Notes 

Mid3 Editth A. Gingrich, '11 will 
appear in recital at Johnstown, Pa., 
this week. Miss Gingrich possesses 
a voice of marked beauty. 

The Ladies' Glee Club have post- 
poned their trip through the Cumber- 
land Valley. which was to have occured 
this month. 

Miss Mabel Shanaman, '14 has 
been "obliged to rest from her music 
studies and undergo an operation in a 
Reading hospital. 

Miss Miriam Ellis, '13 is missed 
from our halls. ITer recovery from 
ill health and return to L. V. C. is 
the desire of all her friends. 

The jRecital on Tuesday evening, 
>Dec. 10th is given by students of the 
Conservatory and School of Oratory 
and should be attended by all the 
students and their lriends. Lerd 
-encouragement by your presence. 

Miss Anna E'ry '12, who is teaching 
at Sinking Springs, has been called 
home by the serious illness of her 
father. 

Miss Katherine Gingrich, '12, is 
reported as having a very good list cf 
students in piano at Palmyra. 



Miss Ruth Detweiler, recently 

exhibited her Palmyia pupils in a 

recital, which reflected credit upon 
their instructoress. 



Lecture on Ireland 



(Continued from page 1) 



Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Joint 
Session 

The meeting on Sunday afternoon, 
Dec. 8, was in charge of Miss Lottie 
Spessard. 

The leader gave an excellent talk 
on "Home Missions." Her main 
thoughts werp : chaiity begins at 
home, but have you made your begin- 
ning ; the great land acquisitions of the 
U. S. and the increase in value as 
the population grows: each sower is 
to take the fiel i he finds and do his 
best to secure a harvest; all the 
world has come to America, therefore 
the opportunity is great ; education and 
Christianity are the two apostles that 
must ever march together in giving to 
all the world the whole gospel— the 
state will provide for schools, but not 
for churches ; great responsibility rests 
upon us as student; the U. S. has four 
national ideals- the home, the church, 
the public school and the state; we can 
come nearer home with cur mission 
work than the west, for right in our 
own college, we need a searchlignt 
sometimes to find the little sparks of 
Christianity. 

The subject was discussed by the 
Association members, e ch speaker 
emphasizing the fact that "charity 
b3gins at home," meaning by 
"home", our college. It was 
suggested that the Y. VV. and Y. M. 
require an entrance fee of one dollar, 
just as the matriculation and athletic 
fees and that the extra money cb'ain- 
ed, be used in getting speakers for 
our meetings and in sending students 
t) the summer conferences. 



Kalo-Clio- Joint Session 

Piano duet, Mary Spayd, Fabtr 
Stengle; original stury, Carl Schmidt; 
reading, Josephine Urich ; quartette, 
Edith Gingrich, Lottie Spe c S3rd, F. B. 
Lyter, D. M. Lung ; sketch, Florence 
Mentz, Helen Brightbill, I. L. Ress- 
ler, J. B. Lyter; oration, G. A. 
Williams: vocal solo, H. E. Ulrich; 
Olive Branch and Examiner editois. 



Duke of Wellington. In the Park 
there is a large monument in honor of 
the Duke. Near Belfast, the largest 
city, is the Giants Causeway, 40,000 
vertical columns of black rock along 
the sea. A gaint is supposed to 
have lived there for his chair, and 
other things can be s^en, which 
compare proportionately to a giant's 
size. Another thing of interest is 
the Round Towers, one hunclrpd and 
eighty of which remain today. 
They are eight feet high and fifty 
feet across Ihe base. Their da'e is 
not known. After leaving Belfast 
sail was set for Scotland and the 
lecture ended. 

Dr. Hoenshel has travelled quite 
extensively and is the author of 
several books. His lecture proved 
very interesting and quite instructive. 
A goodly number of Irish jokes added 
the necesssary spice. 



Some of the school boys "hiked 
it" to Cornwall, on Saturday. 



Items of Interest^ 

Miss Margaret Rigler, formerly a 
student at Lebanon Valley, and a 
graduate of Pratt Institute, is filling 
the position of Kindergarten-Gover- 
ness in a private family in Wheeling, 
W. V. 

Miss Gertrude Cook, formerly a 
student at Lehanun Valley, is visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron G. Heir in town. 

Mrs. J. S. Mills, wife of the late 
Bishop J. S. Mills is slowly recover- 
ing from a serious illness at her home 
in town. 

Miss Ora Bachman made a flying 
trip to Middletown, on Saturday. 

Miss Catharine E Hershey 'ex-'12, 
spent last Sunday visiting friends in 
Annville. 

Mr. E. M. Roedtr, formerly pro- 
fessor cf German at L. V. sent 
Thanksgiving day with Rev. Witman, 
cf town. 

Mr. Dwight T. John, ex-'ll, i» 
teaching at the Galahad Prep School, 
Wisconsin, on the same faculty with 
Guy Wingerd, '12 

Mr. Walter Biever was seen at 
school last week. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 
What the World ia Doing, P. C. 
Hoffman; Future Significance of the 
Democratic Victory, Clayton Zuse; 
Debate: Resolved, That a Tariff for 
Revenue Purpoases Only Prove a 
Benefit to the Country. Affirmative, 
Cuiry, H. Heinzleman. Negative, 
R # Amdt, i.. Snyder; piano duet, J. 
Jones, L. Snyder: Living Thoughts, 
editor. 



Inter-Class Foot Bali Game 

Last Wednesday the annual Sopho- 
more-Freshman football game was 
played. The game was won by the 
Sophomores by the score 7-6. 

The game was one of the most sen- 
sational and exciting ever played on 
the athletic field. It was generally 
conceded before the game that the 
Sophomores were the stronger, and 
should v in, but the team they met play- 
ed such a strong game that the 
result, was in doubt until the game 
was ever. 

Neither team scored until the 
fourth quarter, when DayhofT carried 
the ba'l over for a touchdown, and 
kicked the gcal. Ihe Freshmen 
received the ball, and after trying 
three forward passes, without any 
success. Pell carried the ball around 
right end for a seventy-five yard run, 
and a touchdown. The Freshmen 
failed to kick the gcal. 

Both teams played a good game. 
Pell was the shining star of the game 
with his sensational run and wonderful 
defensive playing. 

Dayhoff played an excellent game 
for the Sophomores. The lineup-: 



S°phcmores 
Shepley 
Carl 
Uister 
Statton 
Jamison 
Steng le 
lender 



L. E. 
L. T. 
L. M. 

C 
R. G. 
R. 1. 

R. E 



Freshmen 
Snyder 
Ernst 
Zuse 
Krause 
Gonder 
Von Bereghy 
Long 



Select Your Presents at 



t Harnish & Smith's ( 

I BOOK STORE f 

1 r € 

f Everything in the Gift Line, and all at & 

9 Reasonable Prices. f 

j| Parker Fountain Pens, College Jewolry $ 

and Christmas Novelties t 

at £ 

2 Harnish & Smith's « 



Book Store 



Larew Q B. Evans 

Snavely L. H. B. Kirkpatrick 

MacNelly R. H. B. M<okey 

Dayhoff F. B. Pell 

Touchdowns-Dayhoff, Pell. Goal 
from touchdown. Dayhoff. Referee 
— Wanner, U. of P. ; Umpire-Richie, 
L. V. C. ; Linesman— Wert, L. V. C. 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity / ✓ ' Quality 
Main Street 



D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets, 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 



Near Post Office 



ANNVILLE 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 



A. G. SPALDING L BROS. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
IPartiea a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, I \> 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



2&-130 Nassau St. 



25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO. 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's"' 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

REGOID0IENDHTION AGENCY 

Although paragraphs 5 and 6 of our contract 
refer respectively to RECOMMENDATIONS and 
NOTIFICATIONS yet this Agencv is almost 
entirely aRECOMMEXDATION AGENCY. Since 
we sold our publishing business, 1905, our time 
lias been devoted to selecting and recommending 
applicants for positions we iiave been asked to 
fill. 

We give no time ti hea say or newspaper 
vacancies 

When a friend or a member of the Agency re- 
ports an actual vacancy, we take it up: 

We are in need of more teachers to supply the 
direct calls from school authorities, 

THE TEACHERS' AGFNCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Alumni 



J. E. Jacoby, '10, is taking 
graduate work at U. of P. this yegr. 

Miss Myrtle Garret, '10, visited in 
the Ladies' dormitory on Friday even- 
ing. 

Mr. A. R. Spessard, Conservatory 
'07, is teaching Voice and Oratory in 
Lymland College in Glendale, Ken. 

Mr. Charles W. Plnmmer, '10, has 
oeen spending some time around the 
college during the past month. 

Dr. Donald Cowling, '02, President 
of Carleton College, and Mrs. Cowl- 
ing, who was formerly Miss Elizabeth 
Stehman of the class of 1907, have 
been visiting the parentt of the latter 
in Mountville, Pa. 

Rev. Gordon Rider, '05, of Hagers- 
town dedicated a new U. B. church, 
of which he is pastor. Dr. Gossard 
assisted at the servcies. 

Rev. George Richter, '09, and Mrs. 
R'chter were forced to flee from Kono 
County to Freetown on account of an 
uprising of the natives. The native 
Africans were rebellious on account 
of a tax imposed upon them by thei»" 
chief and began to burn houses and 
kill those who supported the govern- 
ment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richter, who went 
out as missionaries last spring were 
hoth confined to a hospital in Kono 
County with fever a nd were forced 
to Itave their beds and flee to Free- 
town by or<kr of the English officials. 

The journey was especially tedious 
to them ; n their condition and they 
are at present in tho Freetown hos- 
pital, seeking res - . The rebellion 
has since been checked by the English 
soldiers. 



Have You Heard the New 

Alma Matef 

Music by J. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S. R. Oldham. *02 

HARRY H. CHARLTON 

AGENT 



W. D, ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa- 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon 0/ a I ley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art. Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. *D. Sossard, ^President 
Jtnnvitie, !Pa. 

BONEBRHKE THEOLOGICAL 



DAYTON, O. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 
1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

■2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" o 1 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 

J. P. LAN DIS 

Or J. K. FOUT 

Business Manager 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



ifistitaft 



Rensselaer Polytechnic 

\ SCHOOL of \1 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical^ 

end for a Catalogue. TROY, N- T * 



COIiliEGE ]TnWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume JV. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Decembef 17, 1912 flo. 7 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March S, 1879. 



Star Course 

The second number of the Star 
Course appeared cn Saturday exening 
when the "Dixie Chorus" rendered 
before a very large audience, their 
pleasing and instructive entertain- 
ment. The company which consisted 
of eight Dixie Men carried with them 
scenery which added much to the 
entertainment. The first part of the 
program consisted in the portrayal of 
the history of the negro race in 
pantomime, verse and song. The first 
scene, was laid in Africa. Here 
through the reading of Mr. Coleman, 
the manager, rnd the acting in cos- 
tume by the other members of the 
chorus, the life of the negro in dark- 
est Africa, from early barbarity to 
slavery, was portrayed. The second 
scene was laid in the scuth of ou r 
wn country. Here the home life 
f the slave, his customs and his 
haracter were vividly shown in 
dialogue and song. A genuine 
"darkey prayer meeting" v as one 
feature of their life represented. In 
the second part of the program, the 
resent status of the negro, the 
etter-clasa negro, was represented. 
Songs of our own favorite composers, 
and poetry from their own Paul 
Lawrence Dunbar was rendered in 
way that hearers could not help but 
ecognize the possibilities of the negro. 

The best features of the entire pro- 
gram were the old "plantation songs" 
sung in true "darky" style and the 
oration given by Mr. Cole/nan on 
"The Race Problem." This oration 
Won for him [first prize in an inter- 
state oratorcial contest, and everyone 
Was impressed wi'h the ability and 
intellectual attainments of Mr. 
Coleman combined with his humility 
a nd force of character. The program 
Was certainly unique, instructive 
a nd pleasing. 



The next number will be a Lecture 
by Dr. Wm. College, to be given 
ab^ut.Fan. 5, 1913. 



Recital 

A number of the students of the 
Conservatory and School of Oratory 
appeared in a recital, Tuesday evening. 
Dec. 10th. The recital was quite a 
success. All the numbers were ably 
executed. The order during the pro- 
gram was none of the^best. Let us re- 
spect the performeis and show our ap- 
preciation for their work. The pro- 
gram is given in full. 

Romance, Schutt, Miss Mary B. 
Light; Offertory, Salone, Miss Myrl 
Behney; The Boy Orator of Zepata 
City, R. H. Davis, Mr. Victor Mul- 
hollen; The Butteifly, Lavallee, Miss 
Mabel Bensing; Anne's Confession, 
Green Gables, Montgomery, Miss Anna 
Dubble; a, Idyll, Op. No. 28, No. 4, 
MacDowell, b, Waltz, Op. 70, No. 1, 
Chopin, Miss Mary Painter; a, Rose, 
wie bist du, Spohr, b, Phyllis has 
such ciiarming graces, Wilson, Miss 
Myrle Turby ; Thee Car of Juggernaut, 
Sutphen, Miss Margaret Leithiser; 
Scherzo, Mendelssohn, Mr. J. Fred 
Arnold; His Wedded Wife, Kipling, 
Mr. Verling Jamison; Auf dem 
Wasser, Schubert-Liszt, Miss Velma 
Heindel; When Class A Gave Thanks, 
Coppinger, Josephine Urich; Torch- 
light March, Guilrnant, Miss Ora 
Bachman. 



Clionian Officers for Winter 
Term 

President, Lottie Spessard; vice 
president, Elizabeth Rechard; secre- 
tary, Blanche Risser; cor, secretary, 
Catherine Bachman ; treasurer, Flor- 
ence Clippinger; editor, EUa Weaver; 
chaplain, Florence Mentz; critic, 
Edith Lehman ; pianist, Ora Bachman; 
Judges, Belle Orris, Josephine Urich. 



An Announcement 

The Y. W. C. A. wishes to an- 
nounce that they offer on sale L. V. 
calendars for 25c a piece or $1.00 for 
five. These calendars are arranged 
very cleverly and would make charm- 
ing Christmas presents. The girls 
are doing this in order to raise money 
foi a Summer Conference fund. Every 
loyal son and da i^hler of Lebanon 
Valley should have one, and alumni 
and ex-students can send in orders by 
writing to members of the Y. W. C. 
A. 

The cover page is stamped with a 
large blue and white college eeal. 
The second page has a fine picture 
of Dr. Gossard, while the last four 
pages have pictures of the various 
buildings and scenes in and about the 
college. Let no one fail to supply 
themselves with these splendid sou- 
venirs of the college to distribute 
among those friends you would like to 
interest in your Alma Mater. 




Mr. William E. Herr, '07, of the 
Norfolk Branch of the Navy Y. M. C. 
A. has been "appointed by the Inter- 
national [committee Y. M. C. A. as 
one'of their representatives to go with 
the Atlantic Fleet in their their 
Winter ^cruise, to Guantanamo Bay 
Cuba. He will sail on Jan., 5, on 
the W. S. S. Vermont from H amp- 
ton Roads. 

Miss Mabel Herr, conservatory' 
'07, Principal of the Morris Plains, 
N. J. High School recenty spent 
several days with her parents at 
Annville. 

Miss Jessie Brane, ['09, Conserva- 
tory, was the guest of her cousin 
Russel Weidler, Thursday. 



COLLEGE 



N E W S 



College fieuus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 
General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

C. L. SHEPLEY 
Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to — ■ all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Each and every one of us exerts 
some influence over those with whom 
we come in contact day by day; and 
each and every one of us is influenced 
for good or 'evil by son e one of our 
associates, no matter how strong and 
unapproachable we may suppose our- 
selves to be. If this chain of influ- 
ence, this circle of radiating power is 
so strong, so entire and so unbroken, 
how great is our opportunity for doing 
good and how unlimited is our respon- 
sibility. 

In a college, especially, where the 
associations and relations are so 
entirely within the limits of a 
comparatively small student body and 
where everyone in some way or anoth- 
er is thrown in contact with everyone 
else, this responsibility is doubly 
great. 

Those of us who attended the joint 
session of the Y. M. ana Y. VV. C. 
A., Dec. 8, heatd thes? words 
frequently spoken : ' Let us turn a 
search light on our own lives and 
characters!" Are we doing our share 
toward the Christian Association 
Work and toward the religious life 
of the school. 



The student b'>dy and the faculty 
have stood by our Alma Mater and by 
our College Athletics, magnanimously 
this year. They have boosted college 
spirit; they have helped to sing the 
college songs and give the college 
yells; they have given generously 
of their worldly-goods. Ihis is a good 
omen. It means that the college 
is growing, and growing better. 

But is this all we can do? Can 
we not now turn more of our 
attention to the Christian Associa- 
tions? Can we not "boost up" 
these organizations, also? We have 
seen what whole hearted, united, 
hand - to - hand efforts can do for 
Athletics. Let us now try the same 
prescription for our Y. M. and our Y. 
W. C. A. 

The editorial columns of the 
"News" may iiave preached this doc- 
trine rather hard of late. But is it 
not a worthy course, and do not those 
of us who attend these meetings, 
know that it is necessary that some- 
thing be done? Column upon column 
has been given to our social life and 
to athletics, so do we not owe some 
space to our religious life? You 
have an influence upnn your classmate. 
Exert it for good. Bring your chum 
to the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Make 
him feel that he owes something to 
this work as well as any other. You 
will never regret that your influence 
and your power over your friend was 
used for good. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The services of the afternoon were 
conducted by Mr. Brenneman, '15 
The scripture lesson was taken from 
Isaiah 6:1-10, the main thought being 
from the eighth paragraph; ''Here 
Am I ; send me. ' ' 

To be in such an attitude at all 
times that we can trustfully, say in 
answer to a call for duty, "Here Am 
I: send me;" and to show by our 
works that we are obeying the call is 
to live the noble life. 

The cail to duty comes very forcibly 
upon the members*of|cur Y. M. C. A , 
to take up the work of teaching the 
foreign laborer the fundamentals of 
the English languge, and to uplift 
them spiritually the best we can in 
the short time left to us thu college 
year. 



Mr. Russel Weidler, '14 and Mr- 
Paul Bowman haa charge of the 
work Sunday. The attendance was 
good. 

Conservatory Notes 

Miss Miriam Ellis ,'13 is visiting 
her brother in Philadelphia. She 
reports having heard the Philadelphia 
Symhony Orchestra among other 
musical treats. 

Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt of the 
Conservatory faculty sang in a 
musicale at Zion Lutheran church, 
Lebanon, Pa., on Thursday evening 
of last week. 

Mr. J. Fred Arnold} entertained his 
mother luesday and Wednesday of the 
past week. Mrs. Arnold was present 
at the Students Kecitai on Tuesday 
evening. 

Prof. E. Edwin Sheldon gave the 
opening recital on the Moller pipe 
organ recently instated in the new 
Lutheran churc.i at Lititz, Pa. Sat- 
urday evening, Dec. 14th. He was 
assisted by Mrs. Sheldon, soprano. 

Miss Ruth Qiigley was a week end 
visitor at the home of Miss Alice 
Bomberger, Palmyra, Pa. 



Mathematical Round Table 

The Mathematical Round Table 
held its usual interesting meeting 
Monday evening, Dec. 9. The follow- 
ing program was rendered: 

The Teaching of Geometry. Prof. 
S. 0. Grimm; Originals in Geometry, 
Russell Weidler; Discussion, Do 
Latin and Greek have more disciplin- 
ary value than Mathematics? Faber 
Stengle, Florence Mentz, Lottie 
Spessard, Ivan Ressler. 

The next meeting will be held Jan. 
29, 1913. 

Clio-Kalo Joint Session 

On Friday evening the Clioniati°ar.d 
Kalozetean Literary Societies held a 
joint session in Kalo hall. A pleasing 
program was rendered, which was 
enjoyed very much by the societies and 
visitors. At the conclusion of the 
1 rograrn, refreshments were served W 
the social hall, and a pleasant hour 
was spent in a social way. Thise 
of the faculty present were Dr. Leh" 
man, Profs. Grimm, Adams, Joh n ' 
son, and Scnmidt, 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAM 



CLIONIAN JAN. 3 1913 
Piano duet, Ruth Quigley, Vera 
Meyer; Clio's New Year Resolutions, 
President; Paper, Edith Lehman; 
Violin solo, Ruth E. Engle; Debate, 
Resolved : That the honor system in 
examinations in college is desirable 
and practical. Affirmative, Flor- 
ence Clippinger. Velma Heindel. 
Negative, Elizabeth Rechard, Esther 
Heintzelman; Olive {Branch, Editor; 
Piano solo, Edith Ginrgich. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Belle Orris, '15, had charge of 
the "Christmas Service," Sunday 
afternoon. The leader in her remarks 
created a Christmas spirit which per- 
vaded the entire meeting. Although 
much has been written about Christ- 
mas, it's cheer, its carols, yet when 
the season draws near it is always 
welcome, always fresh and beautiful 
to us and always new. The Christ- 
mas lesson can never be told too many 
times. There is no better time 
than now. at this Christmas season, 
for every earnest heart to ask, "Have 
I let Christ in?" Chiist came to 
Bethlehem ages ago that he might 
come into cur heart now. Today we 
regard it as a great shame that there 
was no room in the inn for the 
Saviour, but some nave no room for 
him in their hearts today. 
"How silently, how silently, 

The wondrous gift is given. 

So God imparts to Human hearta 

'I he blessings of his heaven." 

This is a season for giving but in 
that giving, may we carrv with us 
the thought of the poet; "The gift 
without the giver is bare." A gift 
of heart and soul is accentable to 
Gcd 



jj Select Your Presents at $ 

t Harnish & Smith's f 

i BOOK STORE i 

f Everything in the Gift Line, and all at h 

a Reasonable Prices. !, 

| Parker Fountain Pens. College Jewelry $ 

a nd Christmas Novelties © 

f at f 

} Harnish & Smith's J 

^ Book Store jj 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 



Quantity 



Quality 



Main Street 



D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc, 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality* 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free, 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS, 

26-130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St.. NEW YOR^ 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 
First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Kagle Hotel Annville, F»a 

VVM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY CF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES, ALT AYS FEESH 

W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

"Flower Brand" Potato 

Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAHrRAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A RULE 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Hardeen. 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers' 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teacheis, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annual y hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent Inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we And 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing po.-iii.~ns. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to 1111 the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

P. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlan'a 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Items of Interest 1 



Hope Renn, '16, visited her aun t 
Mrs. Dr. Brunner, Lebanon, Sunday 
afternoon. 

Misses Edith Lehman and Lottie 
Spessard entertained the Senior 
fir Is, Saturday afternoon. 

The girls of the Dormitory took ad 
vantage of Leap year, on Tuesday 
evening and played the parts of gal- 
lants in good style for amateurs. 

Among the visitors at the Clio-Kalo 
joint session on Friday evening were 
Miss Mary fastor, of Harrisburg, 
Miss Ruth Strickler, of Lebanon, and 
Mr. Arnold, of Lickdale. 



Kalo Officers 

At the business session of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society on Fri- 
day, the following officers for the 
winter term were elected. Presi- 
dent,!. L. Ressler, ' 13; vice presi- 
dent, H. H Charlton, '14; critic, 
Carl Schmidt, '14; rec'd. secretary, J. 

A. Walters, '14; cor. secretary, Harry 
Bender, '15; ctiaplin, Verling Jami- 
son, '15; editor of the examiner, F. 

B. Lyter, '15; pianist, Faber Stengle, 

, '15; Sergeant-at-arms, Fred Arnold; 
iss't. Sergeant-at-arms, Hallman. 
At this meeting George A. Williams, 
'13 was elected president for the 
spring term. 



Time is money, and some persons 
who borrow the latter take plenty of 
the former to pay it. 



The population of the North and 
South Pole are exactly the same. 



Have You Heard the New 

Alma Mater* 

Music by J. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S. R. Oldham, '02 

HARRY H, CHARLTON 

AGENT 

One cent postpaid on receipt of 25c. 



W, D, ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty, 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon l/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
3?ev. S. *D. Sossardj ^President 
jfnnvillej iPa. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



DAYTON, O, 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 
The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

The English. 
The Missionary. 
The Deaconess. 



Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" o. 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Wo k, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Forerigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
i*gle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

mKtpx further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Creai 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 

$100 Typewriter $32.51 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE II. li. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 





Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LANDIS 



SCHOOL of \\ 
■X ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 
TROY, N-Y. 



Send for a Catalogue.